Renovating an old stone cottage

ajn9000

New Member
Any thoughts on this plan for an old stone (slate & lime mortar) - the back wall is 600mm below ground level - walls need to breath and condensation minimised ...

Walls preped back to stone and raked out

Back wall tanking (tank up to 1m from floor): 12mm s&c renderwith SBR; 2mm Newton 107F brushed on
Back wall above tanking: 15mm Limelite renovating plaster scratch coat; use mesh at joint with tanking
Back wall to finish: Limelite Easy bond; 10mm Limelite renovating plaster; Limelite high impact finish

Other walls (no tanking): 15mm Limelite renovating plaster scratch coat; 10mm Limelite renovating plaster second coat; Limelite high impact finish

What would you do?
 

martinemj

Well-Known Member
I would fill any holes or dub out with an nhl lime mix
Sc if you wish where your tanking ...
Rest of it
.
Scratch coat limelite
2nd coat limelite over tanking too...
Finish limelite high impact


It's lovely stuff to use but God is it expensive
Bought some recently 21.00 bag plus vat
 
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JML

Member
Insulated dry lining system for walls. Ensuring external ground level is at least 150mm below floor level. What is the floor make-up?.
 

Groove37

Well-Known Member
Any thoughts on this plan for an old stone (slate & lime mortar) - the back wall is 600mm below ground level - walls need to breath and condensation minimised ...

Walls preped back to stone and raked out

Back wall tanking (tank up to 1m from floor): 12mm s&c renderwith SBR; 2mm Newton 107F brushed on
Back wall above tanking: 15mm Limelite renovating plaster scratch coat; use mesh at joint with tanking
Back wall to finish: Limelite Easy bond; 10mm Limelite renovating plaster; Limelite high impact finish

Other walls (no tanking): 15mm Limelite renovating plaster scratch coat; 10mm Limelite renovating plaster second coat; Limelite high impact finish

What would you do?
@Ritch
 

JML

Member
he as said its 600mm below g/l
Interested to establish the height of the external ground level in relation to the floor level. To state back wall is 600mm below ground is not giving that information. As the mention of tanking by the OP may suggest high ground levels, lateral and or penetrating damp issues.
 

ajn9000

New Member
Interested to establish the height of the external ground level in relation to the floor level. To state back wall is 600mm below ground is not giving that information. As the mention of tanking by the OP may suggest high ground levels, lateral and or penetrating damp issues.

FFL is 600mm below external GL - slab on ground is 200mm below that. The wall is 600mm thick: solid stone (slate), 400 years old. Already have a chemical DPM, so tanking is to eliminate any residual lateral/penetrating damp. Floor make up: 100mm concrete, DPM, 100mm insulation, 500g polythene, UFH, 50mm wet screed, decoupling membrane, slate tiles.
 

JML

Member
Ideally l think you should if possiably to reduce the ground level and install a land drainage system to prevent dampness. The problem that l have experienced in the past with using s&c and tanking in this situation is that it will slow down/ prevent evaporation and can cause a chimney effect in that the damp will rise further within the structure in a bid to evaporate. Hope this helps.
 

tapit

Well-Known Member
Ideally l think you should if possiably to reduce the ground level and install a land drainage system to prevent dampness. The problem that l have experienced in the past with using s&c and tanking in this situation is that it will slow down/ prevent evaporation and can cause a chimney effect in that the damp will rise further within the structure in a bid to evaporate. Hope this helps.
say again?
 

martinemj

Well-Known Member
Jml is right
Best way to deal with damp in old houses is to do as much as possible to reduce the moisture against wall if you can

Also look at pointing ,guttering and renders in poor condition

some kind of drainage would help the situation or by removing the soil to below internal floor by say 6 to 12 "(french drain)

Not always possible....though


Dr martin says....Treat the cause if you can and not the symptom
 

ajn9000

New Member
Ideally l think you should if possiably to reduce the ground level and install a land drainage system to prevent dampness. The problem that l have experienced in the past with using s&c and tanking in this situation is that it will slow down/ prevent evaporation and can cause a chimney effect in that the damp will rise further within the structure in a bid to evaporate. Hope this helps.

External: will be installing a delta membrane into a land drain, as you describe JML

For internal plastering: I'm so far down to 2 options: i) original plan (Limelite), or ii) insulated dry lining system. I'd like the walls to breath as much as possible so i) seems to be the best option. I'm wondering whether to reduce the height of the tanking to minimise chimney effect / maximise evaporation.

Any other suggestions for internal plastering?
 

JML

Member
External: will be installing a delta membrane into a land drain, as you describe JML

For internal plastering: I'm so far down to 2 options: i) original plan (Limelite), or ii) insulated dry lining system. I'd like the walls to breath as much as possible so i) seems to be the best option. I'm wondering whether to reduce the height of the tanking to minimise chimney effect / maximise evaporation.

Any other suggestions for internal plastering?
Personally l would ditch the tanking as it prevents evaporation, you can also get water vapour passing through plaster and condensing on the face of tanking.
 
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