Renovating a old solid 9 inch wall built house

Cal.Mad

New Member
Hi All,

Trying to get an answer once and for all on the best way to board solid 9inch walls.

I have taken all the old plaster off and the walls are bone dry both upstairs and down. Will I be OK to just dab a insulated board to all external facing walls?

Don't fancy battening at all as the house is well over 100 years old.

Thank you
 

Retired Spread

Well-Known Member
giphy (29).gif
 

Nath80

Well-Known Member
Providing that no damp issues Gypsum is fine to use in that situation. An alternative option is also available on the link below.

That looks horribly flimsy. You can see the whole wall flex considerably when he screws the plasterboard on. It's the equivalent of building a stud wall out of roofing batten.

Looks a decent system around steels though
 

MakeItSmooth

Well-Known Member
That looks horribly flimsy. You can see the whole wall flex considerably when he screws the plasterboard on.


I never thought it would happen, but finally you've said something I agree with, Nath.


I detest flimsy approaches like that - they go up quickly and conveniently for the builder, but it totally screws over other tradespeople who try to work on the house during its lifetime.
 

The Apprentice

Well-Known Member
I never thought it would happen, but finally you've said something I agree with, Nath.


I detest flimsy approaches like that - they go up quickly and conveniently for the builder, but it totally screws over other tradespeople who try to work on the house during its lifetime.
With the clips fixed to the wall you’d be surprised just how rigid it is
 

Brimstone

Well-Known Member
Given the current shortage of galv metal and lack of stocks of standard metal studwork, is it even available and at what cost?
 

Marco kans

New Member
Hi All,

Trying to get an answer once and for all on the best way to board solid 9inch walls.

I have taken all the old plaster off and the walls are bone dry both upstairs and down. Will I be OK to just dab a insulated board to all external facing walls?

Don't fancy battening at all as the house is well over 100 years old.

Thank you
No no no! You must consider that conditions might change. For instance you dot and dab wall a dry wall and next winter a downpipe leaks. There will be problems and you are legally liable. Dot and dab and or any gypsum undercoat is for cavity walls.
 

The Apprentice

Well-Known Member
No no no! You must consider that conditions might change. For instance you dot and dab wall a dry wall and next winter a downpipe leaks. There will be problems and you are legally liable. Dot and dab and or any gypsum undercoat is for cavity walls.
How can you be liable for what happens in the future? Poor maintenance is down to the owner of the property surely.
Gypsum’s been used in terraced houses with solid walls for a long time with no adverse effect for a long time now
 

The Apprentice

Well-Known Member
You can see the wall move back at least 5mm just with the pressure of him pushing on the drill. Are the clips not used in the video?
You can see movement on the video and I will be discussing this with the technical team. I can only assure you that when I have used it I have been impressed with how solid the wall actually is.
 

Marco kans

New Member
How can you be liable for what happens in the future? Poor maintenance is down to the owner of the property surely.
Gypsum’s been used in terraced houses with solid walls for a long time with no adverse effect for a long time now
The law has changed mate. Its your duty of care to meet British Standards. The fact conditions might change can argue the case that a dot & dab system should not be used on 9"' brick. Baton and board or metal stud is better so give a good reason for not doing that? A dry system has less chances of failure so is better. Same applies to Bonding & hardball, and did apply to browning & carlite metal lathing back in the good old days! Lime systems are best. Limelite cement backing & Limelite renovating are cement based but ok to use. Or sand cement render. Render float & set doesn't provide insulation though so dry systems usually recommended as building control dictates that insulation should be considered in the design when fully replastering walls. Or fit a 5mm mesh cavity drain membrane 1st if you really want to use bonding! Beware of causing condensation though
 

The Apprentice

Well-Known Member
The law has changed mate. Its your duty of care to meet British Standards. The fact conditions might change can argue the case that a dot & dab system should not be used on 9"' brick. Baton and board or metal stud is better so give a good reason for not doing that? A dry system has less chances of failure so is better. Same applies to Bonding & hardball, and did apply to browning & carlite metal lathing back in the good old days! Lime systems are best. Limelite cement backing & Limelite renovating are cement based but ok to use. Or sand cement render. Render float & set doesn't provide insulation though so dry systems usually recommended as building control dictates that insulation should be considered in the design when fully replastering walls. Or fit a 5mm mesh cavity drain membrane 1st if you really want to use bonding! Beware of causing condensation though
Building regs state that if more than 50% of the wall is to be replaced then insulated boards or framed system using insulated boards or insulation should be used on external walls I believe.
I would be very surprised if you could be held accountable for what could happen, that’s not to say I’m right by the way, just an opinion. Lime would not meet the current regulation from what I’ve read unless it was a listed building or a conservation project. Not worth risking best thing to do is to speak to your local building control to be on the safe side.
 
Last edited:

Nath80

Well-Known Member
You can see movement on the video and I will be discussing this with the technical team. I can only assure you that when I have used it I have been impressed with how solid the wall actually is.
I've just watched it back. I can see with the clips there should be very minimal movement. Probably good practice to use one close to where 2 pieces meet like on the head of the window.
 

Brimstone

Well-Known Member
Building regs state that if more than 50% of the wall is to be replaced then insulated boards or framed system using insulated boards or insulation should be used on external walls I believe.
I would be very surprised if you could be held accountable for what could happen, that’s not to say I’m right by the way, just an opinion. Lime would not meet the current regulation from what I’ve read unless it was a listed building or a conservation project. Not worth risking best thing to do is to speak to your local building control to be on the safe side.
Lime does meet the Building Regs even on new builds, and seems to be increasing in usage of private new builds. However, you still need the insulation under it in the 50% example etc.
The legal liability is much more murky but can certainly apply, it kind of spins on the test of what is reasonably foreseeable in the future.
I would argue a burst pipe is not, that is a maintenance issue or responsiblity of the installing plumber. An exposed weather wall on the coast might be where the architect/builder/plasterer might be held liable.
If I fit a chimney liner and/or a stove I have to recognise that the homeowner might change the stove for another one, or its the weather wall etc, and cover my ass accordingly, or will not be complying with Building Regs/HETAS.
I thought I saw something in the BG book somewhere about loadings on single and double plasterboard, vs some of the other BG boards.
 

bof

Well-Known Member
Not 100% sure on what your question is, are you asking when you are dabbing what is the maximum weight you can put on the dabs?
Was curious If insulated board is stuck on with dab or foam (with fire fixings ) then needs bonding out , is there regs for weight
 
Top