Rendering mix



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#1
whats the best mix for rendering?
How to prepare the walls?
Do you art waterproofed in scratch coat then just plasticiser in top coat?
Just like to no which is the best way to do this from start to finish to help let render breath and not let no water come through/cause damp/ crack.
I know there so many different ways people make the mix just like to no one of the best ways?
If anybody could be of any help be great
 

TheWand

Active Member
#3
Have you done any rendering before or is this your 1st go solo?

What you rendering onto brick/block/new /old any pics
 
#5
Have you done any rendering before or is this your 1st go solo?

What you rendering onto brick/block/new /old any pics
Cheers for the reply TheWand I done and apprenticeship for about 2 and half years with a plasterer and most work we did was all internally skimming and boarding really, then I went on my own and that's all I have seen to do, I get asked by a fair few people to render but because my lack of knowledge in that particular area of plastering I have tended to bottle it. But I'm deciding to give it a blast just that I don't no the mix and what additives to use. And I haven't got any photos sorry. And id say it's relatively old brick work not proper old though mate. Thanks again for the reply
 

Olican

Private Member
#6
Rendering isn't to be underestimated jack, soo many things to consider. Know your substrate/background, sand, cement , additive all will have an effect. Suction control is so critical. There are so many factors that you learn over years of practice, you won't get a magic formula that will work wonders. Mix ratio depends on back ground but I personally use 4:1 scratch 5:1 top for most work. The best advice I can give is 1: read through archives on here, lots of good stuff 2: always tag @Rigsby that man is a rendering ninja good luck
 
#7
Rendering isn't to be underestimated jack, soo many things to consider. Know your substrate/background, sand, cement , additive all will have an effect. Suction control is so critical. There are so many factors that you learn over years of practice, you won't get a magic formula that will work wonders. Mix ratio depends on back ground but I personally use 4:1 scratch 5:1 top for most work. The best advice I can give is 1: read through archives on here, lots of good stuff 2: always tag @Rigsby that man is a rendering ninja good luck
Cheers for the reply mate and it sound like a plan I'll have scout through some of the posts :bananahappy:
 

Rigsby

Private Member
#8
As Olican says read up on the archives.

You will need to be precise on what the job is before any specs can be given.

If you want to play safe, then on a refurb use a base coat like Weber Rend aid, cure then render with their ocr.

Other manufacturers have similar.

Cant go far wrong seeing as it is just add water.
 

Rigsby

Private Member
#10
Thats what I do with sand and cement.

Scratch coat between 4:1 and 5:1 depending on finish, location, substrate with Feb Rendamix waterproofer. Second coat 5:1 to 6:1 as above but with Febmix + plasticiser.

Use washed plastering sand not soft building sand. Try and get ordinary cement not cement that has plastiser already in it.
 
#11
Thats what I do with sand and cement.

Scratch coat between 4:1 and 5:1 depending on finish, location, substrate with Feb Rendamix waterproofer. Second coat 5:1 to 6:1 as above but with Febmix + plasticiser.

Use washed plastering sand not soft building sand. Try and get ordinary cement not cement that has plastiser already in it.
Speedy reply mate means a lot ! I'm gonna see what I can do as my first one will only be for family/friend :bailando:
 

stuart23

Private Member
#12
I'd stay away from sand and cement and just use bagged renders, loads of companies out there. Phone them up and speak to the reps and they will talk you through exactly how to prepare and use there products.
 

Olican

Private Member
#13
@Rigsby i read that it's best to add a waterproofer in the scratch coat then just as a plastiscer in the top does this sound about right ? Sorry for all the questions haha
Here's one for you as an example. Hacked off back to brick, washed down . A good SBR slurry , first coat whilst sbr tacky. 4:1:1 sand cement lime approx 100mm febmix second coat 5:1:1 scl 100mm febmix
View attachment 15557
View attachment 15558
 

Simon85

Well-Known Member
#14
Don't want to come across cheeky,but if you haven't done it before I'd stay away from it, you'll likely make a balls of it. Better to get out with someone doing externals to see how to do it right first. If you don't know how to mix it right, you'll not be fit to finish it right as you've no. Experience in it. U make a mess of someones outside, and ppl ask who done that, it will do yr rep a world of harm. Either that or get a good man or two to come with u and help u and keep u right. If it's brick you be better to scud it first, or use weber rend aid, before scratching it. Scratch is usually between 14 n 16 shovels to a 25kg bag cement, and top coat 18-20 per bag. Mortar mix needs adjusted according to sand used, dampness etc.
 

TheWand

Active Member
#15
Cheers for the reply TheWand I done and apprenticeship for about 2 and half years with a plasterer and most work we did was all internally skimming and boarding really, then I went on my own and that's all I have seen to do, I get asked by a fair few people to render but because my lack of knowledge in that particular area of plastering I have tended to bottle it. But I'm deciding to give it a blast just that I don't no the mix and what additives to use. And I haven't got any photos sorry. And id say it's relatively old brick work not proper old though mate. Thanks again for the reply
I would advise you to give the job to another plasterer and you help out on it and get them to talk you through it etc. Like @Olican says its a different ball game. Skimming can be easily fixed if you mess up but if you mess up on some poor buggers house it could be a disaster.
 

aspotofbother

Well-Known Member
#18
Rendering isn't to be underestimated jack, soo many things to consider. Know your substrate/background, sand, cement , additive all will have an effect. Suction control is so critical. There are so many factors that you learn over years of practice, you won't get a magic formula that will work wonders. Mix ratio depends on back ground but I personally use 4:1 scratch 5:1 top for most work. The best advice I can give is 1: read through archives on here, lots of good stuff 2: always tag @Rigsby that man is a rendering ninja good luck
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#20
Ye
Don't want to come across cheeky,but if you haven't done it before I'd stay away from it, you'll likely make a balls of it. Better to get out with someone doing externals to see how to do it right first. If you don't know how to mix it right, you'll not be fit to finish it right as you've no. Experience in it. U make a mess of someones outside, and ppl ask who done that, it will do yr rep a world of harm. Either that or get a good man or two to come with u and help u and keep u right. If it's brick you be better to scud it first, or use weber rend aid, before scratching it. Scratch is usually between 14 n 16 shovels to a 25kg bag cement, and top coat 18-20 per bag. Mortar mix needs adjusted according to sand used, dampness etc.
Yeah mate I fully agree never do it on somebody's property hence why have avoided it ever since I started really. Really appreciate the comments as well helps me out :)
 
#23
I would advise you to give the job to another plasterer and you help out on it and get them to talk you through it etc. Like @Olican says its a different ball game. Skimming can be easily fixed if you mess up but if you mess up on some poor buggers house it could be a disaster.
Yeah mate Only doing it for family / friend no money involved only about 1meter high by 5 meters long. Wouldn't even both attempting it on a customers house would rather get somebody else to do it and i would help to gain some experience
 

pixie

Active Member
#25
When you do end up doing your first job start small and gradually progress from there as ability and confidence grows. Good luck.
 

Simon85

Well-Known Member
#26
Yea start on auld garden walls, something not too awkward or big til u know what you're doin.
 

Olican

Private Member
#27
Or start on your own, any dwarf walls on your own house. Or parents/in laws friends etc. Someone with the back of a garage no one sees
 
#29
Or start on your own, any dwarf walls on your own house. Or parents/in laws friends etc. Someone with the back of a garage no one sees
That's the plan mate I won't be doing it on any customers until I feel confident and has experience from other plasterers who do mainly external work (y)
 

theclemo

Private Member
#30
Rendering isn't to be underestimated jack, soo many things to consider. Know your substrate/background, sand, cement , additive all will have an effect. Suction control is so critical. There are so many factors that you learn over years of practice, you won't get a magic formula that will work wonders. Mix ratio depends on back ground but I personally use 4:1 scratch 5:1 top for most work. The best advice I can give is 1: read through archives on here, lots of good stuff 2: always tag @Rigsby that man is a rendering ninja good luck
Suction control lol
 

Marshy

Private Member
#32
Where are you based @jacktheladd ?? Perhaps one of the lads on here might be in your neck of the woods to pop round and help you out/advise first hand?? Best of luck by the way plenty of good advice on this thread already for you (y)
 

Orangemachineman

Well-Known Member
#33
Cheers for the reply TheWand I done and apprenticeship for about 2 and half years with a plasterer and most work we did was all internally skimming and boarding really, then I went on my own and that's all I have seen to do, I get asked by a fair few people to render but because my lack of knowledge in that particular area of plastering I have tended to bottle it. But I'm deciding to give it a blast just that I don't no the mix and what additives to use. And I haven't got any photos sorry. And id say it's relatively old brick work not proper old though mate. Thanks again for the reply
Surely you covered this at college?


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