Primers

Stewie03

Well-Known Member
I went to quote a job yesterday for a living room ceiling it's all artex and thick f**k off swirls and flower petals and has had about 15 coats of paint by the look of it as usual the customer has coving up so can't overboard it, I'm gunna magic mix and skim it but dont want to chance using pva on it,I've never used these grits and primers which one would anyone spreads reccomend
 

Cockney1

Well-Known Member
I went to quote a job yesterday for a living room ceiling it's all artex and thick f**k off swirls and flower petals and has had about 15 coats of paint by the look of it as usual the customer has coving up so can't overboard it, I'm gunna magic mix and skim it but dont want to chance using pva on it,I've never used these grits and primers which one would anyone spreads reccomend
There’s nothing wrong with good old pva!
 

Stewie03

Well-Known Member
I agree I've always used pva and nothing else but this paint on the artex is to shiny and with it being a really thick pattern I thought would a grit be best,
 

Wayners

Well-Known Member
Have a quick dig and see if it's the soft contract artex. That's stuff you can get lots off after breaking through emulsion with scraper. Of course the chance of asbestos being present should be considered.

Blue grit is cheapest option and frog yellow masking around the coving to keep clean.

Some would use diluted SBR to seal then plastering pva and hit it.


Gyprime wound work but expensive.

Blue grit or similar would be my choice. Best value. Let it dry off for 6+ hours.

See what others think.
 

bof

Well-Known Member
Foot traffic above then refuse , the thicker the plasterer the more likely it'll delaminate and do nasty damage to those below
Saw walls at bottom of coving
Remove ceiling and coving
Batten level ( or rule dab on joists )
Rockwool for sound as it's cheap and quick
Board
Board 6" perimeter to bring new coving down to cover wall damage , you might need 2 levels
 

The Hobo

Well-Known Member
I went to quote a job yesterday for a living room ceiling it's all artex and thick f**k off swirls and flower petals and has had about 15 coats of paint by the look of it as usual the customer has coving up so can't overboard it, I'm gunna magic mix and skim it but dont want to chance using pva on it,I've never used these grits and primers which one would anyone spreads reccomend
tell them your to busy and walk away if it all comes off your the one to blame
 

bof

Well-Known Member
tell them your to busy and walk away if it all comes off your the one to blame
Classic case of customer expecting cheap shortcut caused by lack of foresight to danger , mixed with being tight and watching TV programs telling them to skim it
It's no wonder skim monkeys of Facebook are getting in and driving down prices
 

The Hobo

Well-Known Member
Classic case of customer expecting cheap shortcut caused by lack of foresight to danger , mixed with being tight and watching TV programs telling them to skim it
It's no wonder skim monkeys of Facebook are getting in and driving down prices
I just cant be f**k*d with s**t work anymore walk away always some better class work comes along
 

Wayners

Well-Known Member
I've done loads and never had a problem.
Well might have got caught a bit but normally local knowledge of surface in that area helps and during preparation you soon fund out if it's looking like trouble. First job is to dig at it. See what's under and if solid.
Don't lash on PVA then wet plaster especially if it's a little soft. That's where blue grit or spr works as blocks water soaking in from plaster.
Seal
Come back when dry and skim
Just speak up and talk through any problems early on with customer. Don't chance it. Remember you walk away.
 

bof

Well-Known Member
@Stewie03 how thick is the artex , add on your z mix and skim , now how thick is it all , throw in a living room ( hence large span ) how rigid are the timbers with someone bouncing about upstairs or a bath filled with large Mrs ,
Now if you think the depth of solid plaster is going to handle that then you can sleep at night
If it were upstairs and no foot traffic no problem
After you have explained your concerns to the customer ( keep a copy of email or text as proof ) then if they still want to go ahead you can sleep well




Untill two months later you pass bye and see the for sale sign outside lol
 

Stewie03

Well-Known Member
@Stewie03 how thick is the artex , add on your z mix and skim , now how thick is it all , throw in a living room ( hence large span ) how rigid are the timbers with someone bouncing about upstairs or a bath filled with large Mrs ,
Now if you think the depth of solid plaster is going to handle that then you can sleep at night
If it were upstairs and no foot traffic no problem
After you have explained your concerns to the customer ( keep a copy of email or text as proof ) then if they still want to go ahead you can sleep well




Untill two months later you pass bye and see the for sale sign outside lol
I'll have a word and see if I can get him to get it overboarded I doubt it though as customers dont wanna run the risk of the coving getting damaged tbf the artex pattern is thick it would cover with a zombie mix and 2 coats of multi i reckons would be 3 coated but around the light the flower petals are to thick, to much risk I think I'll walk if he dont want it boarded
 
  • Like
Reactions: bof

The Hobo

Well-Known Member
I'll have a word and see if I can get him to get it overboarded I doubt it though as customers dont wanna run the risk of the coving getting damaged tbf the artex pattern is thick it would cover with a zombie mix and 2 coats of multi i reckons would be 3 coated but around the light the flower petals are to thick, to much risk I think I'll walk if he dont want it boarded
are you talking coving or cornice
 

Stewie03

Well-Known Member
Not doing it now lol he doesn't want the coving taken down he's asked if he got it checked for asbestos and theres no traces if I can scrape the thick points off and reskim I politely declined it
 

The Hobo

Well-Known Member
Not doing it now lol he doesn't want the coving taken down he's asked if he got it checked for asbestos and theres no traces if I can scrape the thick points off and reskim I politely declined it
dosnt hurt to refuse dose it
 

superspread

Well-Known Member
I agree I've always used pva and nothing else but this paint on the artex is to shiny and with it being a really thick pattern I thought would a grit be best,
Normally I’d say bostick plaster primer or BG bond it, but as it’s heavy artex , I’d go blue grit , and the added bonus it’s the cheaper of the 3
 

Squarehead

Well-Known Member
Normally I’d say bostick plaster primer or BG bond it, but as it’s heavy artex , I’d go blue grit , and the added bonus it’s the cheaper of the 3
Only really use bostik and BG. Used blue grit years ago. How is blue different to the other two?
 

Wayners

Well-Known Member
With the bostik has anyone put SBR on firsts?
Guess if it's solid there is no need. Only on real naff walls.
I've used bg and blue grit but that is a bit course and rough at times. Easy to apply though with roller vs the Bostik Plasterer's Stabilising primer, as brush on but I want to try for interest.
 

ChrispyUK

Well-Known Member
Had part of a ceiling come down on one of our rental properties earlier in the year. Artex over lath and plaster. Big patch that just missed the tennant. Thankfully no one hurt and thankful that they didn’t make a big deal out of it but one of those that could have had dire consequences.
 

Squarehead

Well-Known Member
More course aggregate, so thinking on a job like this , where heavier coats are needed , blue grit might be the better option
I remember not getting on with blue grit as it didn't control suction too well (febond I think it was) is that still the case?
 
Top