Plastic Trowel - when to use



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#1
Hi, another new addition to the forum.

I will be honest my general experience is limited, I don't plaster everyday and I don't trade in it at all.

It's something I always took interest in and have slowly learnt and gained some knowledge in (however limited).

My process has always been 1st coat, allow to dry pull out the lines 2nd coat, allow to dry pull out the lines spray bottle and stainless steel trowelling to polish.

This has generally worked well enough for me on my walls at home. No complaints from the wife either [emoji23].

However I've wanted to expand my knowledge and have been reading forums and advice on ways to better the skim on the wall, get that lovely glass feeling.

My sister has just had a lot of work done at her house and I spent 20 minutes with the plasterer getting some advice and doing some practical work to learn.

He mentioned using a plastic trowel, the two he had were the Plaziflex by Regina, and the Delehedy. He recommended getting the Delehedy and suggested that you didn't need to use any water when "polishing up".

Simply told me to do my normal process and then end with working the wall with the Delehedy to flatten and smoothen the wall out. He said this would give me the same effect without all the water, glass like smooth plaster.

Anyone like to advance on that, maybe give me some advice or point me in the right direction.

I'm hoping with some guidance and training and practice there is potential for me to trade in this one day.

Thank you in advance


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Vincey

Private Member
#3
Hi, another new addition to the forum.

I will be honest my general experience is limited, I don't plaster everyday and I don't trade in it at all.

It's something I always took interest in and have slowly learnt and gained some knowledge in (however limited).

My process has always been 1st coat, allow to dry pull out the lines 2nd coat, allow to dry pull out the lines spray bottle and stainless steel trowelling to polish.

This has generally worked well enough for me on my walls at home. No complaints from the wife either [emoji23].

However I've wanted to expand my knowledge and have been reading forums and advice on ways to better the skim on the wall, get that lovely glass feeling.

My sister has just had a lot of work done at her house and I spent 20 minutes with the plasterer getting some advice and doing some practical work to learn.

He mentioned using a plastic trowel, the two he had were the Plaziflex by Regina, and the Delehedy. He recommended getting the Delehedy and suggested that you didn't need to use any water when "polishing up".

Simply told me to do my normal process and then end with working the wall with the Delehedy to flatten and smoothen the wall out. He said this would give me the same effect without all the water, glass like smooth plaster.

Anyone like to advance on that, maybe give me some advice or point me in the right direction.

I'm hoping with some guidance and training and practice there is potential for me to trade in this one day.

Thank you in advance


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Hi
The thing with plastic,stainless steel,Carbon or flex trowels is only the guy behind it creates the finish not the trowel.
 

Dropsalot

Private Member
#5
Welcome matey, as @Vincey says, it's the tool holding the tool that gets the Finish. The spread you spoke to does it same as me......if it's old hobbly walls I sometimes use a bit of water, but not much, new work....none.
 

theclemo

Private Member
#6
When the skim starts to go flynnyman that's the best time for the plastic trowel.
 

Simon85

Well-Known Member
#7
Best time to use plastic trowel, would be never in my opinion, but each to their own. Only seen them in use once, and I wasn't overly impressed. Maybe works for other people though....
 
#8
Thank you for all of your advice. A friend has asked me to do their kitchen as a favour, I've agreed to do it as they are not fussed for a perfect finish (all of you probably just cringed). I'm confident I will make it a nice job, but not a professional standard, would be interested to use the plastic trowel, and if it doesn't suit I can always revert to what I know and am used too.

If it's ok I will upload some photos so you can "critique" so I can get some feedback on it.

I don't aim to ever put myself out as a tradesmen in plastering, this was a self venture that I enjoy doing in my own home, sadly the walls that need plastering still are few and far between. You advice and support is greatly appreciated.


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Vincey

Private Member
#11
Thank you for all of your advice. A friend has asked me to do their kitchen as a favour, I've agreed to do it as they are not fussed for a perfect finish (all of you probably just cringed). I'm confident I will make it a nice job, but not a professional standard, would be interested to use the plastic trowel, and if it doesn't suit I can always revert to what I know and am used too.

If it's ok I will upload some photos so you can "critique" so I can get some feedback on it.

I don't aim to ever put myself out as a tradesmen in plastering, this was a self venture that I enjoy doing in my own home, sadly the walls that need plastering still are few and far between. You advice and support is greatly appreciated.


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Tbh if it's small area I just use my carbon trowel now but if it's a 2,3/4 or 5 bag hit I'd definitely pull out Speedskim for flatten and finish
IMG_2055.JPG
 
#13
I have ordered a plastic bladed (ST?) speedskim which will be here tomorrow. Used one with my friend when we did my living room, it really speeds things up and stops all the "faffing" as it was referred to when I was trying to flatten the lines, especially on a big wall.

The job is not a huge kitchen, I suggested three bags of multi finish, 4 to be safe. I think he has order 5 though, (super safe [emoji23])


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#14


Here is my last lot of work.

Any advice from the professionals.

Not hand to be sanded anywhere, just mist coated with screwfix bare plaster paint, then two coats of dulux endurance, smooth walls all round no cracking etc.

I wouldn't be able to tell from looking at a photo but I know the pros would.

Feedback good and bad welcome!!


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#18
They were Harris dust sheets from B and M, think they were £7 a sheet maybe £8. Waterproof too, which was a right result when the radiator pipe had leaked in the day, left a perfect puddle on the sheet, never sunk through.

Thanks for the feedback. It's hard to tell from those photos I'm sure, but the finished paint job looks good so it was fine for me.

Harris dust sheets though, solid, until my german Shepards found them


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raggles

Private Member
#21
Seeing as this is a plazzi trowel thread @plasters1stopshop have you stopped selling the valles trowels ? Every time I try to order online your out of stock !!
 

Danny

Administrator
#25
Seeing as this is a plazzi trowel thread @plasters1stopshop have you stopped selling the valles trowels ? Every time I try to order online your out of stock !!
I got a brand new blade if you want it?