Plastering Over Existing Wall Plate.

Tesign

New Member
Hi All,

I'm new to the forum. I’m planning to self-manage my loft conversion in the summer, and I want to resolve any potential detailing well in advance.

I’ve got a situation where a new stud wall meets an existing masonry wall below to create a double height space. The objective is for the new stud wall to align flush with the existing masonry wall. However, the existing masonry wall has a wall plate (see attached sketch).

So, my question is, when it comes skimming over the walls, can you skim over the wall plate? I’m guessing not as this would lead to cracks.

Therefore, how would you approach this? I was thinking of overlaying the wall plate with EML but would this mean the walls will no longer be flush (or at least appear flush)?

Many thanks,
 

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spread95

Well-Known Member
Hi All,

I'm new to the forum. I’m planning to self-manage my loft conversion in the summer, and I want to resolve any potential detailing well in advance.

I’ve got a situation where a new stud wall meets an existing masonry wall below to create a double height space. The objective is for the new stud wall to align flush with the existing masonry wall. However, the existing masonry wall has a wall plate (see attached sketch).

So, my question is, when it comes skimming over the walls, can you skim over the wall plate? I’m guessing not as this would lead to cracks.

Therefore, how would you approach this? I was thinking of overlaying the wall plate with EML but would this mean the walls will no longer be flush (or at least appear flush)?

Many thanks,
Best to ask the Architwat, he decides the spec.
 

malc

TPF Special Forces
double plasterboard the wall ,then the plasterer will not have a problem with the skim.
 

Tesign

New Member
@malc @Monkey Boy

Thank you for your comments

I want to avoid overlaying the existing masonry wall with plasterboard as this will reduce the stair width below (see image 01).

My thinking now is to cut back the wall plate to allow the plasterboard to align with the existing wall below (as per image 02) and then skim over. In fact, I could completely get rid of the wall plate all together as it structurally no longer needed but wanted to see if there was a way round this.
 

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MIXERMAN

Well-Known Member
Bingo. I've done quite a few .and found a lot of architect s plans are crap. You have to change so much stuff .steels ect. They pop round stick a tape measure through the loft hatch . Do very little. Unless you pay big money. I've put steels in that are so over the top , I'm surprised the house didn't collapse.
 

Stevieo

Royal Spin Doctor
Bingo. I've done quite a few .and found a lot of architect s plans are crap. You have to change so much stuff .steels ect. They pop round stick a tape measure through the loft hatch . Do very little. Unless you pay big money. I've put steels in that are so over the top , I'm surprised the house didn't collapse.
Was it you that had to dismantle the gableto get one in?
 
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