Plastering Gable - Covering Wall Plate

Self Build

New Member
Any advice for protecting an exposed timber wall plate end prior to plastering a gable? Would sticking on some DPC to the wall plate end be sufficient with some expanded metal (or riblath) then nailed over the DPC on to the block?

Any other alternatives?

I had considered boxing it off with the fascia and soffit, but there is just too wide a span to cover and it wouldnt look right.

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essexandy

The Lake Governor
Nail dpc patch with one central galvanised clout nail and then patch of mesh similarly with one nail only
You can use couple of angle bead off cuts just snap of the mesh section and overlap them to cover timber end
Dpc patch but not fixed to timber at all, just around it, and the same with the EML. You want the movement of the timber to be entirely independent of the render.
Your welcome.
 

Monkey Boy

Well-Known Member
Why only one nail?
You place the nail at the point the timber does not move central left right wise & about 10 mm up from bottom. One for dpc and then one right piggy back on top but you don’t drive it home either it is just a peg the the mesh sits on so don’t drop to floor
Long way down scaffold to collect bit of mesh
 

Self Build

New Member
Dpc patch but not fixed to timber at all, just around it, and the same with the EML. You want the movement of the timber to be entirely independent of the render.
Your welcome.

Thanks for the advice. Will do that.

Will also tuck the DPC in over the timber and will probably nail around DPC rather than through the bits of angle mesh to avoid puncturing DPC.

Somebody else offline suggested cutting off and using the end of a Mortar Plasticiser gallon which would make sense also as there is a natural turn in around three sides of the wallplate. Ultimately sealing it is the important part, and then stage 2 is using the mesh to provide grip for the plaster

PS: for those enquiring about the positioning of the wallplate, my assumption is that it relates to the angle of the roof
 
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Deleted member 23452

Guest
PS: for those enquiring about the positioning of the wallplate, my assumption is that it relates to the angle of the roof
It does, but it shouldn't be there as there are no joists at that point. The gable and tiles should meet along the entire length of both apex sides.

Aside from the obvious difficulties of closing it neatly and not causing cracks in the render there is the issue of rot. The outer leaf of wall will be moist, any moisture on the top of the apex will run down until it meets the timber which will rot. The moisture (and rot) will migrate along the timber not only causing a problem there, but also at the first couple of bird's mouths.
 

Self Build

New Member
It does, but it shouldn't be there as there are no joists at that point. The gable and tiles should meet along the entire length of both apex sides.

Aside from the obvious difficulties of closing it neatly and not causing cracks in the render there is the issue of rot. The outer leaf of wall will be moist, any moisture on the top of the apex will run down until it meets the timber which will rot. The moisture (and rot) will migrate along the timber not only causing a problem there, but also at the first couple of bird's mouths.
The situation is what the situation is, finding the best solution to the situation is my only focus now
 

Brimstone

Well-Known Member
I'm thinking it is a self build, wall plate too long or expected to nail gable to it, and you make errors and learn along the way. Sometimes you see this on very old houses too.
If nothing is bearing on it you could go to the effort of auger drilling and chiselling it out/back enough to get a decent wodge of mortar on it, with a bit of mesh across that. Bit of effort that though.
Steep it in 5 star preservative then paint it?
Put a bit of lead flashing down from soffit over the end overlapping a decent amount?
 

Self Build

New Member
It is a fcuk up. Your confusing what you want, with what is. A common attitude, but no problem as it keeps people in work sorting it out down the line. (y)

I'm thinking it is a self build, wall plate too long or expected to nail gable to it, and you make errors and learn along the way. Sometimes you see this on very old houses too.
If nothing is bearing on it you could go to the effort of auger drilling and chiselling it out/back enough to get a decent wodge of mortar on it, with a bit of mesh across that. Bit of effort that though.
Steep it in 5 star preservative then paint it?
Put a bit of lead flashing down from soffit over the end overlapping a decent amount?

Not a self build. It is a complicated setup and a bit too complicated to explain.

An old stone wall building with a small partial corner extension.

Essentially the wall plate is exposed and that needs protection now. The wall plate sits on top of a concrete bed which was set on top of the stone wall for structural purposes. The roof overhangs the gable by around 12 inches

Auger drilling/chiselling is not impossible but covering it would seem the most straightforward solution

Water is unlikely to penetrate through the DPC
 
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Deleted member 23452

Guest
Auger drilling/chiselling is not impossible but covering it would seem the most straightforward solution
The best cover for it will be a loin cloth, they've been used to cover balls up for millennia.

Water is unlikely to penetrate through the DPC
Unless the house is upside down I presume you mean DPM? If so then unless the DPM is lapped under the wall plate then it's not going to stop water getting to it.
 

raytheplasterer

Well-Known Member
Can't you paint the timber with some type of weather proofing varnish or bitumen before covering it to stop it rotting down the line.
 
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