Plaster reinforcement mesh.

lostbees

New Member
Last week I finished the plaster reinforcement mesh layer on the out side of some ICF walls.
I just put the base coat on the inside walls of the ICF walls. Code says I need 4 coats and to hit an over all thickness.

I was planning on doing a single layer of fiberglass mesh on all the inside walls, but wondering if a second layer of mesh would be worth putting on the bottom 6' as this building will be used as a honey house?
If I did do 2 layers of reinforcement what layer would go on top of the other layer?
 

lostbees

New Member
I'm in the US and just noticed this forum is mostly of people from the other side of the pond. I'm sure there will be different thoughts on everything.
 

Brimstone

Well-Known Member
Last week I finished the plaster reinforcement mesh layer on the out side of some ICF walls.
I just put the base coat on the inside walls of the ICF walls. Code says I need 4 coats and to hit an over all thickness.

I was planning on doing a single layer of fiberglass mesh on all the inside walls, but wondering if a second layer of mesh would be worth putting on the bottom 6' as this building will be used as a honey house?
If I did do 2 layers of reinforcement what layer would go on top of the other layer?
What difference would it being a honey house make? If your thinking of heavy tubs etc hitting walls then just fit some wall panelling/protection boards..
 

lostbees

New Member
I'm using Gigacrate right on the foam blocks. The mesh cuts down cracking and makes a stronger layer with less of a chance of impact damage.
Yes I'm thinking about wall damage over time. I will end up getting yearly inspections so I will need sealed walls that are smooth and cleanable. I would rather do the extra work now and not have to cover the walls in plastic paneling after a few years.
 

Brimstone

Well-Known Member
I'm using Gigacrate right on the foam blocks. The mesh cuts down cracking and makes a stronger layer with less of a chance of impact damage.
Yes I'm thinking about wall damage over time. I will end up getting yearly inspections so I will need sealed walls that are smooth and cleanable. I would rather do the extra work now and not have to cover the walls in plastic paneling after a few years.
Fair enough, but plastic panelling is much easier to clean down, espcially with sticky stuf like honey & scuff marks. You going to have air con or a chiller in there, might help and a little wall mounted one is easy to fit and not that expensive?
 

lostbees

New Member
Were currently in a smaller set up that was build very similar, but clean up works best by chilling the room, then start washing with cold water, and then moving over to hot for sanitize. Never had any issues with paint chipping, but did have to paint ever 2 to 5 years to keep the inspectors happy. I did not put mesh in the walls of the old honey house and did end up having to a lot more wall patching than I wanted to.

The building will have a few mini split HVAC systems.
 

Brimstone

Well-Known Member
Were currently in a smaller set up that was build very similar, but clean up works best by chilling the room, then start washing with cold water, and then moving over to hot for sanitize. Never had any issues with paint chipping, but did have to paint ever 2 to 5 years to keep the inspectors happy. I did not put mesh in the walls of the old honey house and did end up having to a lot more wall patching than I wanted to.

The building will have a few mini split HVAC systems.
Several of us are beeks on here, I'm a TBH one. Sod rubbing down and repainting every few years - put in some insulated hard finish panels with/ or applied plastic, mastic/seal it all down to prevent small insect infestation,e.g. SH beetle,cockroach etc. Keeps the health bods happy and genuinely worthwhile. Easy to clean down and relatively quickly.
 

lostbees

New Member
I finished the outside plaster this morning. I stopped by the plaster supply house and saw they had a heaver mesh for commercial walls. I grabbed what I needed to do all the inside walls 5' up on the walls. I have never had any bug issues in my honey houses or any other ICF building that I plastered.
Depending on what time I get to bed I might get up at 3am mix more mud.

We have about 1,800 pounds of honey and 600 pounds of wax I need to deal with so we have stock for the farmers markets for the next few weeks.
 

Brimstone

Well-Known Member
You haven't yet..climate change is causing an awful lot of changes in small animal & bug life & distribution patterns. In the uk we are having far more rat/mouse problems now than we have for years. I've had mice enlarge the bee entrance then nest in it overwinter, and rats are now a fact of life in all my outside buildings, traps and poison don't make any difference.
 

MakeItSmooth

Well-Known Member
Ordinary snap-traps don't tend to work very well, but there are some clever designs using adapted buckets/bins:



You'd need to scale this up with a big plastering bucket or dustbin, for rats, and (sorry to sound cruel, but it's just the way it is) you'd ideally need to put several inches of water in the bucket, to help stop them leaping out of the bucket:


It's not pleasant killing rodents, but what else can you do to deal with such a difficult problem?
 

Lastlaff

Well-Known Member
Last week I finished the plaster reinforcement mesh layer on the out side of some ICF walls.
I just put the base coat on the inside walls of the ICF walls. Code says I need 4 coats and to hit an over all thickness.

I was planning on doing a single layer of fiberglass mesh on all the inside walls, but wondering if a second layer of mesh would be worth putting on the bottom 6' as this building will be used as a honey house?
If I did do 2 layers of reinforcement what layer would go on top of the other layer?
Why not just do as the code requires?
 

lostbees

New Member
Why not just do as the code requires?
It's my building and I would rather spend more now in the construction stage than have to fix stuff latter or have larger issues.


About 20 years ago when I first moved to this property there was a mouse issue. Took about 5 years to get them "under control". Once a week I put out a few different types of traps and If I get anything I trap hard till I'm not getting any. 5 gallon bucket traps are the way to go.
 

Stewie03

Well-Known Member
It's my building and I would rather spend more now in the construction stage than have to fix stuff latter or have larger issues.


About 20 years ago when I first moved to this property there was a mouse issue. Took about 5 years to get them "under control". Once a week I put out a few different types of traps and If I get anything I trap hard till I'm not getting any. 5 gallon bucket traps are the way to go.
Must of cost you a fortune in cheese
 

tapit

Well-Known Member
Ordinary snap-traps don't tend to work very well, but there are some clever designs using adapted buckets/bins:



You'd need to scale this up with a big plastering bucket or dustbin, for rats, and (sorry to sound cruel, but it's just the way it is) you'd ideally need to put several inches of water in the bucket, to help stop them leaping out of the bucket:


It's not pleasant killing rodents, but what else can you do to deal with such a difficult problem?
This could be how they built the great pyramids.
 

lostbees

New Member
I say peanut butter, borax, and a touch of honey. Will kill about any pest that eats it from what I understand.
 

Brimstone

Well-Known Member
Rats here ate my poison before I had chance to put it out, didn't leave much of the packet either. No dead rats, nada, anywhere. Would like to try a bucket trap, it'll have to be big though, they're hampster sized rats.
 

Brimstone

Well-Known Member
Ordinary snap-traps don't tend to work very well, but there are some clever designs using adapted buckets/bins:



You'd need to scale this up with a big plastering bucket or dustbin, for rats, and (sorry to sound cruel, but it's just the way it is) you'd ideally need to put several inches of water in the bucket, to help stop them leaping out of the bucket:


It's not pleasant killing rodents, but what else can you do to deal with such a difficult problem?
stick somne cling film over the hole and let them suffocate.
 
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