Pitched Face Render Circa 1900s

S_workman

New Member
Hi All,

My cottage built in 1904 has a render that looks like pitched stone (pictures attached). I believe this to be the original render as every cottage build around the same time in my area has the same render.

Does anybody know what material and technique would have been used to apply this render? And what would be a breathable modern equivalent? (Please ignore last owners non-breathable paint job)

I am assuming that due to the property being built with lime mortar, that it would have been some sort of breathable material?

I have had a builder look at it and his thoughts were that it was precast concrete (due to symmetrical nature of the pitched faces) stuck on to the brick work. I am not so sure as when I scraped the paint off an area (2nd picture) is appears to be one solid mass (no pointing between faces). Additionally I don't think concrete based products were commonly used on residential properties in the early 1900s.

The reason I ask is that I would like to brick up an existing small window and would like the render to match in.

All help much appreciated.

Render1.jpg
Render2.jpg
 

Rigsby

TPF Special Forces
I was taught how to do this in college but with raised pointing.

a scratch coat was applied then the joints was marked out with chalk, then a thin band of render applied over the chalk lines and cut using a stick the width of the pointing and let set. Then mix up a sand, cement and lime mix and apply the course stuff in between the pointing starting thin around the edges getting thicker towards the middle and texture to mimmick Pitched stone. I used a plasterers gauger trowel and the sand was very gritty making it course. The edge of the trowel was used rather than the flat to open up the texture.

Done a few over the years to replicate quoins.
 

tapit

Well-Known Member
I was taught how to do this in college but with raised pointing.

a scratch coat was applied then the joints was marked out with chalk, then a thin band of render applied over the chalk lines and cut using a stick the width of the pointing and let set. Then mix up a sand, cement and lime mix and apply the course stuff in between the pointing starting thin around the edges getting thicker towards the middle and texture to mimmick Pitched stone. I used a plasterers gauger trowel and the sand was very gritty making it course. The edge of the trowel was used rather than the flat to open up the texture.

Done a few over the years to replicate quoins.
I have seen similar with Ashlar.
 

raggles

Private Member
You see a fair bit of this around north Northumberland and the borders. The process I was taught at college was slightly different but end up with the same result.
 

S_workman

New Member
Hi all,
Thanks for all the replies. Much appreciated :)

Is there a name for this technique I.e what am I asking for when trying to find somebody to do it?

cheers!
 

S_workman

New Member
I was taught how to do this in college but with raised pointing.

a scratch coat was applied then the joints was marked out with chalk, then a thin band of render applied over the chalk lines and cut using a stick the width of the pointing and let set. Then mix up a sand, cement and lime mix and apply the course stuff in between the pointing starting thin around the edges getting thicker towards the middle and texture to mimmick Pitched stone. I used a plasterers gauger trowel and the sand was very gritty making it course. The edge of the trowel was used rather than the flat to open up the texture.

Done a few over the years to replicate quoins.
Thanks Rigsby, does this technique have a name? Need to know what I’m asking for when getting quotes :)
 
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