Patching plasterboard and filling chases

#1
Just wondering on everyone's technique of sorting these.
Firstly small section of damaged plasterboard that needs to be cut out and repaired. Cut a square out and cut new piece to size. But do you put it level with the old plasterboard and use a quick set filler or recess it a few mm and use multi? Also I always feel I should tape the joints to prevent cracking but you'll never get it perfectly flat if you do this? Going to be proud a few mm

Also best method for filling chases? Hardwall, then multi on top when set? One coat, and easi fill on top?

Sort of jobs that can take you hours or I'm guessing with the right product sorted in next to no time.
 

Djr

Well-Known Member
#2
Chases hardwall and skim . Plaster board if it's 12.5 put a 9mm in and skim it ova the edges of existing board
 
#5
Just wondering on everyone's technique of sorting these.
Firstly small section of damaged plasterboard that needs to be cut out and repaired. Cut a square out and cut new piece to size. But do you put it level with the old plasterboard and use a quick set filler or recess it a few mm and use multi? Also I always feel I should tape the joints to prevent cracking but you'll never get it perfectly flat if you do this? Going to be proud a few mm

Also best method for filling chases? Hardwall, then multi on top when set? One coat, and easi fill on top?

Sort of jobs that can take you hours or I'm guessing with the right product sorted in next to no time.
I use bonding. If only small chase or a couple bang some cement . Have a brew and should be set to skim
 

ChrispyUK

Well-Known Member
#7
Very helpful. There's a lot of different methods to achieve a very similar result. Always good to take some advice off people and get other ideas
If you're careful, remove skim with stanley./wood chisel, then you can use scrim without the bulge. Done hundreds of patch repairs like that. Completely invisible, and no cracking.
 
#8
Very helpful. There's a lot of different methods to achieve a very similar result. Always good to take some advice off people and get other ideas
Ignore him mate, theres about 3 or 4 nancys on here that call everyone coursers. They’re probably coursers themself, or just rough wannabes.

With patch repair there is a few ways, but get the patched board level with wall . Tape Joints. Skim that section to
Blend it into wall.

For chases i use bonding 60 (sets in 60 min usually less) or normal bonding with dirty water sets fast. Fill chase and open trowel up to take off any excess, so just the chase is filled.

As it sets it Shrinks slightly, then skim over the top and blend in.
 
#10
If you're careful, remove skim with stanley./wood chisel, then you can use scrim without the bulge. Done hundreds of patch repairs like that. Completely invisible, and no cracking.
Yeah I usually do that. Getting asked to repair more and more drylined houses though so not an option
 
#11
Ignore him mate, theres about 3 or 4 nancys on here that call everyone coursers. They’re probably coursers themself, or just rough wannabes.

With patch repair there is a few ways, but get the patched board level with wall . Tape Joints. Skim that section to
Blend it into wall.

For chases i use bonding 60 (sets in 60 min usually less) or normal bonding with dirty water sets fast. Fill chase and open trowel up to take off any excess, so just the chase is filled.

As it sets it Shrinks slightly, then skim over the top and blend in.



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#12
Just the methods i use..
Chases. Pva then hardwall(dont like bonding but has its uses for low suction surfaces like concrete)
Boardwork patches. Cut it out neat same thickness board caulk edges allow to set. Pva edges skim clean edges feathered in 2 coats( no cracks)
 

Wayners

Active Member
#13
Cut out plasterboard and use as a temple to cut new board ready to fit. Fit timber all the way around hole and screw on every side plus Pva edges of hole and new board so no cracking. Dot and dab all the way around new board and push level against wood and hold with a few screws but don't tighten them as you want board to sit flush with ceiling or bar 1mm set back. When filler has set tighten screws and add a few more on the 4 sides then tape edges and smooth over. Light sand when dry and prime with any cheap acrylic undercoat. Now the secret to speed is to keep mixing small batches of fast set like easyfill 20 or you will be waiting around for setting. I can cut out large section and get it spot on in about 2 hours but I have to call back to job to sand and prime when dry. Here is a picture of a larger repair I put right as naff job as it cracked the following day and builder never came back. I replaced coving as well. You could not see the repair when I finished
 

ChrispyUK

Well-Known Member
#14
Cut out plasterboard and use as a temple to cut new board ready to fit. Fit timber all the way around hole and screw on every side plus Pva edges of hole and new board so no cracking. Dot and dab all the way around new board and push level against wood and hold with a few screws but don't tighten them as you want board to sit flush with ceiling or bar 1mm set back. When filler has set tighten screws and add a few more on the 4 sides then tape edges and smooth over. Light sand when dry and prime with any cheap acrylic undercoat. Now the secret to speed is to keep mixing small batches of fast set like easyfill 20 or you will be waiting around for setting. I can cut out large section and get it spot on in about 2 hours but I have to call back to job to sand and prime when dry. Here is a picture of a larger repair I put right as naff job as it cracked the following day and builder never came back. I replaced coving as well. You could not see the repair when I finished
@ Stevie wonder
 
#15
Hi
I like to cut the hole and make it into a nice clean rectangle or square. Depending on where joist is , I then I put battern across the ends and middle to fix plasterboard to. Cut new plaster board to size and then screw up.
I then score a box around the new patch of about 30mm- 40mm with a knife and criss cross the plaster between the edge of the score and the board. I then chip the plaster away from the board (cross crossed) using sharp chisel which then leaves me a nice area to scrim over the join also means skimming to a clear edge rather then feathering. Pva edges of exposed old board and the skim away.

Pictures below are all I could find. Hope that makes sense
Each to their own, there are many ways to achieve a finish but I think this is the best way for me. Takes about and extra 20 mins scoring but for me is worth it to be able to scrim the joins.

Matt
 

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#16
That looks a lot of work for a patch.
Suppose it depends on size but most chases ive come across after sparks have butchered the board usually just cut the board back screw 2x1 timber in to existing board cut new board pva all edges fit board bond then skim, wait till nearly set then brush edges with water, hard trowel, sponge off excess around edges. Done
 

ChrispyUK

Well-Known Member
#17
That looks a lot of work for a patch.
Suppose it depends on size but most chases ive come across after sparks have butchered the board usually just cut the board back screw 2x1 timber in to existing board cut new board pva all edges fit board bond then skim, wait till nearly set then brush edges with water, hard trowel, sponge off excess around edges. Done
It won't crack though a month after its been done!
 
#18
Mine don’t either, been back to some houses done years ago still good, if it’s just one patch fair enough but if you got a house full to do after a rewire your going to be forever doing them like that