Patching cornice

  • Thread starter Deleted member 29624
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Deleted member 29624

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Just got a job in a Victorian hallway and where they had a new front door fitted there is now about a two inch gap of cornice missing. The woman asked me if it could fix it and I was honest and said wasn't sure how to go about it but would ask the question and see what I could come up with. Anyone give me any advice on the best way to go about this.
 
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Deleted member 29624

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Dont have one I'm afraid, its where the cornice should butt up to the doorframe as a full width and height door. I read something about greasing up the cornice and getting a mould of that but not sure how to go about it
 

Heritage Plasters

Active Member
Dont have one I'm afraid, its where the cornice should butt up to the doorframe as a full width and height door. I read something about greasing up the cornice and getting a mould of that but not sure how to go about it

Several ways to do it. You can make a bench run cornice you make then stick up, or run one in place with a jig you make... I did one a few months ago I'll post some pics.

Had to reshape the corner. A miter rod would be helpful here but I didn't have one so used a very straight trowel.
Copy of 20160720_145308.jpg

This is the jig I made and I traced the profile onto a piece of 16 gage metal and cut it out. I ran everything in place since the ceiling was all over the place I made a track on the wall and ran it to that and then just filled any areas above the cornice after.
Copy of 20160720_145341.jpg

Here is a longer section patched after the a wall was removed. Somebody else tried their hand at it before I got there which made things a little more difficult but it worked out in the end.
Copy of 20160720_145320.jpg
 

Builderboi

Well-Known Member
Several ways to do it. You can make a bench run cornice you make then stick up, or run one in place with a jig you make... I did one a few months ago I'll post some pics.

Had to reshape the corner. A miter rod would be helpful here but I didn't have one so used a very straight trowel.
View attachment 19577

This is the jig I made and I traced the profile onto a piece of 16 gage metal and cut it out. I ran everything in place since the ceiling was all over the place I made a track on the wall and ran it to that and then just filled any areas above the cornice after.
View attachment 19578

Here is a longer section patched after the a wall was removed. Somebody else tried their hand at it before I got there which made things a little more difficult but it worked out in the end.
View attachment 19579
Your a goodun as we say here heritage
 

ChrispyUK

Well-Known Member
Could make up a profile off good cornice perhaps and build up gradually with bonding then easi fill. Just chucking it out there mate...I'm a turder, so I'll happily accept the disagree button! :D
 
D

Deleted member 29624

Guest
Could make up a profile off good cornice perhaps and build up gradually with bonding then easi fill. Just chucking it out there mate...I'm a turder, so I'll happily accept the disagree button! :D
@zolco said the same but he's another multi turder and not sure if I trust you's loto_O
 

Lastlaff

Well-Known Member
@Lodan
Picture 1. This is a six inch joint rule - notice the longer pointed edge is chamferred, this allows you too 'strike off' the plaster of Paris - strike off is like ruling off a wall with a feather edge - it brings the new plaster level with the exciting cornice too level it.
Picture 2 & 3. I'm showing how to hold a joint rule and use the exciting cornice to rule off and fill in the missing two inch section. To fill out/dub out/core out the two inch gap you could use sand mixed with plaster of Paris, feed the gear in the hole with a gauger and keep it 10mm back from the cornice face - this sets hard and fast, remember to cross key it. Finish off with plaster of Paris - apply it with a gauged then using your joint rule to strike off the original cornice - job done. You can do it mate!
IMG_6174.PNG
IMG_6176.PNG
IMG_6177.PNG
 
D

Deleted member 29624

Guest
@Lodan
Picture 1. This is a six inch joint rule - notice the longer pointed edge is chamferred, this allows you too 'strike off' the plaster of Paris - strike off is like ruling off a wall with a feather edge - it brings the new plaster level with the exciting cornice too level it.
Picture 2 & 3. I'm showing how to hold a joint rule and use the exciting cornice to rule off and fill in the missing two inch section. To fill out/dub out/core out the two inch gap you could use sand mixed with plaster of Paris, feed the gear in the hole with a gauger and keep it 10mm back from the cornice face - this sets hard and fast, remember to cross key it. Finish off with plaster of Paris - apply it with a gauged then using your joint rule to strike off the original cornice - job done. You can do it mate!
View attachment 19592 View attachment 19593 View attachment 19594
Nice explanation cheers mate
 

plastererpeter

Active Member
Several ways to do it. You can make a bench run cornice you make then stick up, or run one in place with a jig you make... I did one a few months ago I'll post some pics.

Had to reshape the corner. A miter rod would be helpful here but I didn't have one so used a very straight trowel.
View attachment 19577

This is the jig I made and I traced the profile onto a piece of 16 gage metal and cut it out. I ran everything in place since the ceiling was all over the place I made a track on the wall and ran it to that and then just filled any areas above the cornice after.
View attachment 19578

Here is a longer section patched after the a wall was removed. Somebody else tried their hand at it before I got there which made things a little more difficult but it worked out in the end.
View attachment 19579
Jig we call them a horse zinc we use 4 the profile s. Cut with curved snips then use needles files we pin zinc to horse use ing gimp pins
 
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