New Concrete Floor – Prep Required for Engineered Wood & Wall Damp Proofing?

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steve88

New Member
I’ve had a new concrete floor installed in the dining room and hallway to the latest building regs following a disaster with a failed solid oak floor last year. It meets the existing concrete floor in the living room at the same level (see pic). I still have most of the original oak floor in the living room, having removed some areas which had failed (despite existing dpm under concrete).

I am at a loss to know what to do now and have been running through the following options in my head. I’m pretty set on tiles in the hallway now to minimise risk but I have many questions on subfloor prep and what to do with the front room. Any advice/input appreciated.

Option 1: Repair existing oak floor in front room, would require some kind of epoxy DPM and would be a bit of a botch. I’d like to lift and relay with proper subfloor prep but I’ve found no effective way of removing the glue so the existing oak would be scrap. Have the new concrete in hall and dining room finished to a higher level to allow new oak floor to glue directly..

Option 2: Rip up oak in front room, have all 3 rooms coated in epoxy DPM and screeded (sandwich DPM or just epoxy then screed? Or even just epoxy?). Buy new engineered wood (more stable) and glue down in both reception rooms and tile in the hall. The downside here is I’m terrified of gluing anything to screed again after the nightmare I’ve had. I know I could float engineered wood but I much prefer the solid feel of gluing.

I have so many questions in general that I’d greatly appreciate 10mins with someone who knows what they’re talking about. Can I have the concrete finished to glue engineered wood straight down? Is an epoxy DPM sandwich something that is done with a self-levelling compound? Can I get away without two whole screeds considering the new concrete is at a good level? Is there anyway of salvaging the front room oak? I’m also in the process of re-doing damp proofing that wasn’t done properly first time round so having the bare concrete now enables me to have the full Sovereign tanking system applied. I can’t afford to do this everywhere though, but I’m particularly anxious about moisture getting to the floor from the sides which is something it mitigates against. Are there other ways of doing this?

Thanks for your time, and patience…

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bof

Well-Known Member
Haven't a clue mate but as a random input ....line floor with ply or something the put your oak down , concrete can do its own thing
 

Danny

Administrator
Haven't a clue mate but as a random input ....line floor with ply or something the put your oak down , concrete can do its own thing
I think that is what I would do..
Trying to patch it in I think would make it look ro much like a patch
 

ChrispyUK

Well-Known Member
I’d say you haven’t found and sorted the initial problem. Was it a suspended timber floor before putting in the concrete?
What are the ground levels like outside?
 

algeeman

It’s A Boy
I’ve had a new concrete floor installed in the dining room and hallway to the latest building regs following a disaster with a failed solid oak floor last year. It meets the existing concrete floor in the living room at the same level (see pic). I still have most of the original oak floor in the living room, having removed some areas which had failed (despite existing dpm under concrete).

I am at a loss to know what to do now and have been running through the following options in my head. I’m pretty set on tiles in the hallway now to minimise risk but I have many questions on subfloor prep and what to do with the front room. Any advice/input appreciated.

Option 1: Repair existing oak floor in front room, would require some kind of epoxy DPM and would be a bit of a botch. I’d like to lift and relay with proper subfloor prep but I’ve found no effective way of removing the glue so the existing oak would be scrap. Have the new concrete in hall and dining room finished to a higher level to allow new oak floor to glue directly..

Option 2: Rip up oak in front room, have all 3 rooms coated in epoxy DPM and screeded (sandwich DPM or just epoxy then screed? Or even just epoxy?). Buy new engineered wood (more stable) and glue down in both reception rooms and tile in the hall. The downside here is I’m terrified of gluing anything to screed again after the nightmare I’ve had. I know I could float engineered wood but I much prefer the solid feel of gluing.

I have so many questions in general that I’d greatly appreciate 10mins with someone who knows what they’re talking about. Can I have the concrete finished to glue engineered wood straight down? Is an epoxy DPM sandwich something that is done with a self-levelling compound? Can I get away without two whole screeds considering the new concrete is at a good level? Is there anyway of salvaging the front room oak? I’m also in the process of re-doing damp proofing that wasn’t done properly first time round so having the bare concrete now enables me to have the full Sovereign tanking system applied. I can’t afford to do this everywhere though, but I’m particularly anxious about moisture getting to the floor from the sides which is something it mitigates against. Are there other ways of doing this?

Thanks for your time, and patience…

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Get a 3d epoxy resin installed mate....
That's my plan when she kicks the bucket (y)
Screenshot_20190522-140838.png
 

Dansouthcoast84

Private Member
i would latex the concrete... concrete and be bit hit and miss with glueing.

weber also do a liquid dpm.which you could lay before but i havent used that so cant comment on that
 
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