NELA Black Edition

bobski

Well-Known Member
What issue have you had mate, if we need to look into something, you know we will do it


Delivered in box fine.
No damage, looked down the line, there was a kink.
Spoke to supplier, he said to undo the bar that holds the blade in, as the way they're manufactured they come really tight.
Did that, then did it back up again, this time more of them all the way down, about 5.

So I gave a tap on one end of the clamping bar then tapped it back the other way to stretch it along, and its fine for a bit. Next day take it out the van and there's the one kink again.

But when you dismantle it, the blade is fine and bang flat.
 

Plasterers1StopShop

Private Member
Delivered in box fine.
No damage, looked down the line, there was a kink.
Spoke to supplier, he said to undo the bar that holds the blade in, as the way they're manufactured they come really tight.
Did that, then did it back up again, this time more of them all the way down, about 5.

So I gave a tap on one end of the clamping bar then tapped it back the other way to stretch it along, and its fine for a bit. Next day take it out the van and there's the one kink again.

But when you dismantle it, the blade is fine and bang flat.

Easy fix mate, it’ll be due to the fact the blade isn’t all the way to the back of the bracket. Tapping it directly down on a flat surface will sort this.

Give me a call if you need any help and I’ll explain better mate
 

MakeItSmooth

Well-Known Member
Whats fundamentally flawed with its design? I’m actually intrigued as I haven’t heard anything really negative - bar the blades not being available yet

I also haven’t had any of our dealers return one reporting someone has returned their own one. Unsure what conflict there would be, I offer three different types of spat and offer the choice to the end user, in all honesty, it doesn’t matter to me which one you buy from our range

What's flawed with it (the longer sizes of the spat) is that when you apply pressure to the spat, on the wall, and then take the spat off the wall, the blade has gone all wavy.

This is not a random one-off. It happened everytime, to mine.

I think I know why, too.

I'll keep this deliberately brief (unless, for some reason, you want me to elaborate), but one of several combined reasons is that the blade is not indexed/registered in the spat - it is just held straight by a friction-grip, and the tiniest, tiniest bit of flex, as pressure is applied to the spat, in use, can overcome the friction grip enough for the blade to slip just a tiny fraction, at each end. Then, when pressure is released, the blade is unable to return to its original straight position, because the friction-grip won't allow it.
 

Plasterers1StopShop

Private Member
What's flawed with it (the longer sizes of the spat) is that when you apply pressure to the spat, on the wall, and then take the spat off the wall, the blade has gone all wavy.

This is not a random one-off. It happened everytime, to mine.

I think I know why, too.

I'll keep this deliberately brief (unless, for some reason, you want me to elaborate), but one of several combined reasons is that the blade is not indexed/registered in the spat - it is just held straight by a friction-grip, and the tiniest, tiniest bit of flex, as pressure is applied to the spat, in use, can overcome the friction grip enough for the blade to slip just a tiny fraction, at each end. Then, when pressure is released, the blade is unable to return to its original straight position, because the friction-grip won't allow it.

The reason is, the blade isnt located in the bracket correctly. That's it. Majority of the blades on the market are held by 'friction grip' as you call them.

All it needs it locating correctly and there wont be an issue
 

MakeItSmooth

Well-Known Member
The reason is, the blade isnt located in the bracket correctly. That's it. Majority of the blades on the market are held by 'friction grip' as you call them.

All it needs it locating correctly and there wont be an issue



I don't have the spat anymore, to check blade location again, but there is a difference between the grip of the Nela and others I have seen (even though I acknowledge that you have more experience of various spats, firsthand).

The Nela grips at the fulcrum point of the blade - i.e. the point at which the blade bends (this is potentially asking for trouble, especially when there is only 15mm of blade behind the fulcrum point). I can elaborate on this statement, if need be.

Spat-open_.jpg


Furthermore, the Nela blade extends further forward from the fulcrum point than many competing spats, and thus is liable to bend more than the blade on many other spats, so it's a double-whammy. In my opinion, it is not just a random coincidence that many competing spats grip the blade a long distance away from the fulcrum point - it is done with good reason (please note that for the purposes of our discussion I am referring to spats of 1 metre or longer). ...so, yes, some other spats do use friction grip, but they are exerting that grip way aft of the fulcrum point.


The Ox blade bends in a similar manner to the Nela, but has an extruded bead that reliably locates it and prevents it from misaligning during use, rather than relying upon friction. In the event that the blade shifts a tiny fraction, due to the spat flexing during use, or hitting an obstacle, the blade is not prevented from re-settling to true, because it is not being held by friction.

Ox Speedskim SF blade location.jpg



As you know, the Superprof Comfort profile also has a blade that extends quite far from the handle, but, from what I can gather, its blade is forcibly held in place, with permanent indentations, rather than relying on friction. It is therefore unable to slip out of alignment.

Comfort Profile (Profi) spat.jpg





The Nela spat has a totally smooth blade, on both sides.

I am not convinced by your explanation - no matter how you locate the blade (as it's currently designed), it is still held by friction and still not immune from tiny movement due to flexing of the handle. I am guessing that you are referring to locating the blade with its rear edge firmly pressed into the back of the gullet (i.e. ensuring there is no gap such as the one I've illustrated with yellow lines in the above photo). That will help stop the blade creeping any further into the handle, but I don't see how it will stop each end of the blade from creeping ever so slightly forwards (as it had, prior to taking that photo). I'm not just making a vague assumption, here. I can explain in detail how I think this blade creep may be occurring, but I don't want to bore forum members with a longwinded explanation.

To my understanding, the longer the spat, the more significant the issue is likely to be, because the more opportunity there is for the handle to flex under pressure, even though the Nela handle is well made and quite rigid. I am talking about tiny, tiny amounts of handle/blade movement, and all spats flex during use, but I feel it is a combination of tiny design decisions compounding into a problem with blade creep that (in my brief ownership of a Nela Edge) kept distorting the blade.

I've no desire for Nela to suffer bad publicity - mistakes and innocent oversights happen when designing, developing, and bringing new products to market, and I'm not knocking Nela for that - in fact, as I mentioned in an earlier post, it is very obvious from having held this spat that it is beautifully made, and that Nela are sincerely trying to bring a high quality product to the market. The build quality is at least as high as anything else at the premium end of the spat market. It oozes quality. I respect that, and you will note that I didn't spill the beans several days ago, when I could have.

I took you at your word, and trusted your assertions that spare blades will be forthcoming.

I wouldn't have bought the spat in the first place if I didn't think Nela make decent quality products. I bought it in good faith and wanted to like it.

However, what doesn't sit well with me is having seen what I believe to be a serious problem with the spat and yet seeing it still being sold to tradespeople as though it's fit for professional use (which, at this point in time, I don't believe it is, in the larger sizes). That's not on.


I also want to be clear that I believe the design of this spat can potentially be modified by Nela to solve the issue. It has the potential to be one of the nicest spats on the market.
 
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Hillsy

Member
I don't have the spat anymore, to check blade location again, but there is a difference between the grip of the Nela and others I have seen (even though I acknowledge that you have more experience of various spats, firsthand).

The Nela grips at the fulcrum point of the blade - i.e. the point at which the blade bends (this is potentially asking for trouble, especially when there is only 15mm of blade behind the fulcrum point). I can elaborate on this statement, if need be.

View attachment 45865

Furthermore, the Nela blade extends further forward from the fulcrum point than many competing spats, and thus is liable to bend more than the blade on many other spats, so it's a double-whammy. In my opinion, it is not just a random coincidence that many competing spats grip the blade a long distance away from the fulcrum point - it is done with good reason (please note that for the purposes of our discussion I am referring to spats of 1 metre or longer). ...so, yes, some other spats do use friction grip, but they are exerting that grip way aft of the fulcrum point.


The Ox blade bends in a similar manner to the Nela, but has an extruded bead that reliably locates it and prevents it from misaligning during use, rather than relying upon friction. In the event that the blade shifts a tiny fraction, due to the spat flexing during use, or hitting an obstacle, the blade is not prevented from re-settling to true, because it is not being held by friction.

View attachment 45866


As you know, the Superprof Comfort profile also has a blade that extends quite far from the handle, but, from what I can gather, its blade is forcibly held in place, with permanent indentations, rather than relying on friction. It is therefore unable to slip out of alignment.

View attachment 45860




The Nela spat has a totally smooth blade, on both sides.

I am not convinced by your explanation - no matter how you locate the blade (as it's currently designed), it is still held by friction and still not immune from tiny movement due to flexing of the handle. I am guessing that you are referring to locating the blade with its rear edge firmly pressed into the back of the gullet (i.e. ensuring there is no gap such as the one I've illustrated with yellow lines in the above photo). That will help stop the blade creeping any further into the handle, but I don't see how it will stop each end of the blade from creeping ever so slightly forwards (as it had, prior to taking that photo). I'm not just making a vague assumption, here. I can explain in detail how I think this blade creep may be occurring, but I don't want to bore forum members with a longwinded explanation.

To my understanding, the longer the spat, the more significant the issue is likely to be, because the more opportunity there is for the handle to flex under pressure, even though the Nela handle is well made and quite rigid. I am talking about tiny, tiny amounts of handle/blade movement, and all spats flex during use, but I feel it is a combination of tiny design decisions compounding into a problem with blade creep that (in my brief ownership of a Nela Edge) kept distorting the blade.

I've no desire for Nela to suffer bad publicity - mistakes and innocent oversights happen when designing, developing, and bringing new products to market, and I'm not knocking Nela for that - in fact, as I mentioned in an earlier post, it is very obvious from having held this spat that it is beautifully made, and that Nela are sincerely trying to bring a high quality product to the market. The build quality is at least as high as anything else at the premium end of the spat market. It oozes quality. I respect that, and you will note that I didn't spill the beans several days ago, when I could have.

I took you at your word, and trusted your assertions that spare blades will be forthcoming.

I wouldn't have bought the spat in the first place if I didn't think Nela make decent quality products. I bought it in good faith and wanted to like it.

However, what doesn't sit well with me is having seen what I believe to be a serious problem with the spat and yet seeing it still being sold to tradespeople as though it's fit for professional use (which, at this point in time, I don't believe it is, in the larger sizes). That's not on.


I also want to be clear that I believe the design of this spat can potentially be modified by Nela to solve the issue. It has the potential to be one of the nicest spats on the market.
I think you need to get laid mate
 

Plasterers1StopShop

Private Member
I don't have the spat anymore, to check blade location again, but there is a difference between the grip of the Nela and others I have seen (even though I acknowledge that you have more experience of various spats, firsthand).

The Nela grips at the fulcrum point of the blade - i.e. the point at which the blade bends (this is potentially asking for trouble, especially when there is only 15mm of blade behind the fulcrum point). I can elaborate on this statement, if need be.

View attachment 45865

Furthermore, the Nela blade extends further forward from the fulcrum point than many competing spats, and thus is liable to bend more than the blade on many other spats, so it's a double-whammy. In my opinion, it is not just a random coincidence that many competing spats grip the blade a long distance away from the fulcrum point - it is done with good reason (please note that for the purposes of our discussion I am referring to spats of 1 metre or longer). ...so, yes, some other spats do use friction grip, but they are exerting that grip way aft of the fulcrum point.


The Ox blade bends in a similar manner to the Nela, but has an extruded bead that reliably locates it and prevents it from misaligning during use, rather than relying upon friction. In the event that the blade shifts a tiny fraction, due to the spat flexing during use, or hitting an obstacle, the blade is not prevented from re-settling to true, because it is not being held by friction.

View attachment 45866


As you know, the Superprof Comfort profile also has a blade that extends quite far from the handle, but, from what I can gather, its blade is forcibly held in place, with permanent indentations, rather than relying on friction. It is therefore unable to slip out of alignment.

View attachment 45860




The Nela spat has a totally smooth blade, on both sides.

I am not convinced by your explanation - no matter how you locate the blade (as it's currently designed), it is still held by friction and still not immune from tiny movement due to flexing of the handle. I am guessing that you are referring to locating the blade with its rear edge firmly pressed into the back of the gullet (i.e. ensuring there is no gap such as the one I've illustrated with yellow lines in the above photo). That will help stop the blade creeping any further into the handle, but I don't see how it will stop each end of the blade from creeping ever so slightly forwards (as it had, prior to taking that photo). I'm not just making a vague assumption, here. I can explain in detail how I think this blade creep may be occurring, but I don't want to bore forum members with a longwinded explanation.

To my understanding, the longer the spat, the more significant the issue is likely to be, because the more opportunity there is for the handle to flex under pressure, even though the Nela handle is well made and quite rigid. I am talking about tiny, tiny amounts of handle/blade movement, and all spats flex during use, but I feel it is a combination of tiny design decisions compounding into a problem with blade creep that (in my brief ownership of a Nela Edge) kept distorting the blade.

I've no desire for Nela to suffer bad publicity - mistakes and innocent oversights happen when designing, developing, and bringing new products to market, and I'm not knocking Nela for that - in fact, as I mentioned in an earlier post, it is very obvious from having held this spat that it is beautifully made, and that Nela are sincerely trying to bring a high quality product to the market. The build quality is at least as high as anything else at the premium end of the spat market. It oozes quality. I respect that, and you will note that I didn't spill the beans several days ago, when I could have.

I took you at your word, and trusted your assertions that spare blades will be forthcoming.

I wouldn't have bought the spat in the first place if I didn't think Nela make decent quality products. I bought it in good faith and wanted to like it.

However, what doesn't sit well with me is having seen what I believe to be a serious problem with the spat and yet seeing it still being sold to tradespeople as though it's fit for professional use (which, at this point in time, I don't believe it is, in the larger sizes). That's not on.


I also want to be clear that I believe the design of this spat can potentially be modified by Nela to solve the issue. It has the potential to be one of the nicest spats on the market.

I am not 100% convinced you are a user of these products, more of a retail outlet or manufacturer. But, what I can say is the following:

I have personally be dealing with the sales and design of spatulas for over 10 years, in fact we as a company helped develop a number of spats available on the market and actually brought them to the market, therefore I can safely say, we have a high level of product knowledge in this area

As I said previously, those distortions are purely based to the locating of the blade being incorrect, you're more than welcome to visit our depot and I can show you exactly how to over this and the reason behind it.

Can I ask, what is your honest experience in the manufacture of products or engineering of products, because, without this, everything you have said is based on assumptions and not fact.

What does concern me is the fact you are saying the product is now not fit for professional use, and you're concerned that its still available - quite a bold statement when we don't have any issues that haven't been resolved apart from yours. Can you advise where you purchased the product from please, I can then check with my stockists to find out more information on this particular case, as previously said, we haven't had any returns....

What also does interest me is the fact you have two brand new products in your image, not used, and have taken the end caps off to examine in further detail. Either your very passionate about spatulas or there is an alternative motive.....

I strongly believe that NELA are growing to become the market leader (if they aren't already) in the Plastering sector in the UK and can assure you, if there is a fault, NELA will act on it immediately
 
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MakeItSmooth

Well-Known Member
I am not 100% convinced you are a user of these products, more of a retail outlet or manufacturer.
For the last time; no, I am not a retail outlet or manufacturer.
Just because I'm reasonably literate and have outlined specifics about a few spats, and maybe don't speak like I'm on a building site (not that there would be anything wrong with that) doesn't mean I'm a ringer and have some secret agenda to undermine you or the product. I'm just saying what I see. I genuinely purchased a Nela Edge, and I genuinely did experience the blade distorting when I applied normal pressure to it, on a wall.

But, what I can say is the following:

I have personally be dealing with the sales and design of spatulas for over 10 years, in fact we as a company helped develop a number of spats available on the market and actually brought them to the market, therefore I can safely say, we have a high level of product knowledge in this area
Duly noted, and I already acknowledged this. I'm not saying you don't know what you're talking about. I'm saying I have personally witnessed an issue with a product, and you seem to be blithely dismissing it as a 'non-issue'.

As I said previously, those distortions are purely based to the locating of the blade being incorrect, you're more than welcome to visit our depot and I can show you exactly how to over this and the reason behind it.

If you would kindly post a photograph and a more detailed description of the solution you have briefly mentioned, then perhaps I can get closer to understanding the disparity between our different experiences of the product, without needing to travel to your depot, presumably to be vetted by you. I'm sure, as a mail-order firm, you wouldn't expect all your Edge customers to have to visit the depot to find out how to insert the blade properly? Better still, why not create a short youtube video, demonstrating the solution, to help all customers get the best out of the product?

Can I ask, what is your honest experience in the manufacture of products or engineering of products, because, without this, everything you have said is based on assumptions and not fact.
What does concern me is the fact you are saying the product is now not fit for professional use, and you're concerned that its still available - quite a bold statement when we don't have any issues that haven't been resolved apart from yours.

With respect, I don't need a degree in product engineering to witness a blade distorting multiple times, after being reset (but I am absolutely open to you correcting any misunderstanding I might have about how the blade 'should' be seated, to avoid any distortion occurring). If this is nothing more than a simple misunderstanding, then great, but at the moment, until I'm shown otherwise, I have a legitimate concern about the product, and trying to steamroller me won't change that.

Perhaps my issue with the product can be added to your list of 'resolved' ones, but you haven't taken the time to describe your solution yet.


What also does interest me is the fact you have two brand new products in your image, not used, and have taken the end caps off to examine in further detail. Either your very passionate about spatulas or there is an alternative motive.....

The Nela Edge I purchased never saw plaster because I noticed the issue within 20 minutes or so of unwrapping it and pressing it against a wall. I took the end cap off (a single screw) in a bid to understand the structure of the handle.
The Speedskim in the pic is also brand new. I openly told you I sent my Nela back and ordered a Speedskim as a replacement. As you well know, the end caps of the Speedskim are designed to be instantly removable, for blade swapping. Would you like a photo of the ST blade I bought to go with it?

Rather than jumping to the conclusion that there is a sinister conspiracy, maybe you can set the record (and the spat) straight, by helping me understand how the blade should be inserted so that it works as intended. I'm not a competitor or an enemy, so please enlighten me on your method. If you can clearly explain to me how the distortion was caused by me using the blade incorrectly, then I assure you I will be the first to put my hands up, apologise, and recant my concerns, and moreover, I'll do so gladly.

Thanks
 
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Plasterers1StopShop

Private Member
I have said earlier - the blade isn’t inserted correctly and simply needs tapping in.

Its not a manufacturing fault more of the fact some guy didn’t put the blade in properly

it’s very easy, tap it vertically down on a flat surface and the issue is solved
 
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