Looking for information on seamless transition from plasterboard to wood

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#1
Hello there, I have a number of projects within the house which require a seamless transition from plasterboard walls to wooden alcoves where I do not want to add a frame to built-in alcoves and between a plasterboard wall and a bookcase which will be integrated into studding alongside a wall.

I have a number of different books on carpentry, plastering and finishes and none of them look at the transition between plasterboard/plastering and carpentry.

I have seen images online of people's homes finished in the way I have described but very little information is available.

Are there any books on the subject which provide a step-by-step or does anyone have any experience in this subject that they are willing to share?
 
#4
Ok and where in your house do you want to do it?
If your building a new stud wall just allow the depth to a accommodate the alcove you want.
If your doing it on existing walls you need to work out what depth you can play with as you obviously can't make a 12 inch depth alcove with a 4 inch wall.
More often than not these alcoves are built when new walls are put up.
I've done it in a few of my rooms
 

zolco

Private Member
#5
That doesn't look plastered to me but might be completely wrong on it, compared the thickness of the wallpaper to the books anyway. Something similar out of mdf & ply from last year
 

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raggles

Private Member
#7
Wherever plaster and wood meet in a butt joint a crack will almost always appear at some point because the two materials expand and contract at different rates.
This is why you have architrave mouldings around doorways etc.
Shadow gap beads, stop beads etc are used in certain architectural designs to eliminate the need for timber mouldings where two substrates meet creating a feature of the transition between the two materials.
Other than make the object or wall entirely of the same material I very much doubt you could achieve a permanent seamless transition.
 

Danny

Administrator
#9
Wherever plaster and wood meet in a butt joint a crack will almost always appear at some point because the two materials expand and contract at different rates.
This is why you have architrave mouldings around doorways etc.
Shadow gap beads, stop beads etc are used in certain architectural designs to eliminate the need for timber mouldings where two substrates meet creating a feature of the transition between the two materials.
Other than make the object or wall entirely of the same material I very much doubt you could achieve a permanent seamless transition.
Nice reply :)
 
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