Internal Stone Wall Options

sdezigner

New Member
Hi all,

Hope everyone is well. I'm looking for advice on plastering stone walls in my place.
I have a Victorian property where all the walls (internal and external) are solid stone with thick horsehair plaster/ lime and multiple layers of wall paper. Some of the external walls are quite damp as the previous occupants never did any work to the property, neglected the pointing and the roof, resulting in lots of leaks. The internal walls are all dry, but on removing the wallpaper, a lot of the existing skim and plaster has come off so I have decided to remove it completely.
For the external walls, I am likely going to frame it out, insulate it and dryline it. I did consider having it lime plastered, but have struggled to find plasterers to do it, I know it will be expensive, and the insulation will help with the heating bills.

With the internal walls (solid stone walls between rooms), I am not really sure what to do. The options are:
Lime. (expensive and still can't find someone to do it)
Timber battens, or metal (gypliner) and drylining.
Dot and dab and skim. Easiest option, but means that you can never expose the stonework again (not that I plan to)
Sand cement. (Not)
Other?????

All rooms have really high ceilings, picture rails, and coving, some rooms have a dado rail as well. I am hoping that I can save the decorative elements, but I know in some rooms where the external walls are too damaged with damp, they will have to be redone.

I know there is no consensus on stone walls, and each property is different, but hoping you guys might have some advice on how to move forward.


Thanks,
Sam
 

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Hi all,

Hope everyone is well. I'm looking for advice on plastering stone walls in my place.
I have a Victorian property where all the walls (internal and external) are solid stone with thick horsehair plaster/ lime and multiple layers of wall paper. Some of the external walls are quite damp as the previous occupants never did any work to the property, neglected the pointing and the roof, resulting in lots of leaks. The internal walls are all dry, but on removing the wallpaper, a lot of the existing skim and plaster has come off so I have decided to remove it completely.
For the external walls, I am likely going to frame it out, insulate it and dryline it. I did consider having it lime plastered, but have struggled to find plasterers to do it, I know it will be expensive, and the insulation will help with the heating bills.

With the internal walls (solid stone walls between rooms), I am not really sure what to do. The options are:
Lime. (expensive and still can't find someone to do it)
Timber battens, or metal (gypliner) and drylining.
Dot and dab and skim. Easiest option, but means that you can never expose the stonework again (not that I plan to)
Sand cement. (Not)
Other?????

All rooms have really high ceilings, picture rails, and coving, some rooms have a dado rail as well. I am hoping that I can save the decorative elements, but I know in some rooms where the external walls are too damaged with damp, they will have to be redone.

I know there is no consensus on stone walls, and each property is different, but hoping you guys might have some advice on how to move forward.


Thanks,
Sam
The lack of comments on this one shows most leople on here havnt a clue.
 
I don't think i have enough horses for all my walls..
Also walls seen a bit holy-er. Than I first thought. Got a bit of filling/making good to do first.

Internal Stone Wall Options
 
Our own house was built in the 17 or 1800s. Stone walls, no damp proofing. Had been dry lined in the 70s.

I remember one of the downstairs floors was so rotten that I gave the joist a wobble and 2 foot came off in my hand (I think they assumed the air bricks were just a unnecessary inconvenience, and blocked a number of them)

Took out all the badly done modern stuff, and did the whole downstairs in lime. Upstairs internal walls were gypsum, but any externals that I messed with, were lime again. My partner tells me we moved here about 11 years back, and the walls where you could remove the rotten skirtings without tools now show no sign of damp at all.

I seriously believe lime is a magic bullet for old places with no dpc, but drylining will hide the issue well enough, I guess. BC will want whatever the insulation is on the inside of external walls in conversions, so that rules out lime in lots of instances.
 
Our own house was built in the 17 or 1800s. Stone walls, no damp proofing. Had been dry lined in the 70s.

I remember one of the downstairs floors was so rotten that I gave the joist a wobble and 2 foot came off in my hand (I think they assumed the air bricks were just a unnecessary inconvenience, and blocked a number of them)

Took out all the badly done modern stuff, and did the whole downstairs in lime. Upstairs internal walls were gypsum, but any externals that I messed with, were lime again. My partner tells me we moved here about 11 years back, and the walls where you could remove the rotten skirtings without tools now show no sign of damp at all.

I seriously believe lime is a magic bullet for old places with no dpc, but drylining will hide the issue well enough, I guess. BC will want whatever the insulation is on the inside of external walls in conversions, so that rules out lime in lots of instances.

what about your upstairs walls lol
 
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