Internal lime plaster

Paul Williams

New Member
Hi all
Pricing labour and materials (and probably getting) a job on listed building, stone walls. Used Hydraulic lime and sand on external works before but not internal. There's approx 230m2.

Any advice on best products to use much appreciated, timing issues between coats also, noticed quite a bit of dubbing out also.

Many thanks for any advice.
 

Bauwer

Well-Known Member
Hi all
Pricing labour and materials (and probably getting) a job on listed building, stone walls. Used Hydraulic lime and sand on external works before but not internal. There's approx 230m2.

Any advice on best products to use much appreciated, timing issues between coats also, noticed quite a bit of dubbing out also.

Many thanks for any advice.
Hi Paul,
We specialize in highly vapour permeable insulated plaster and render supply for older solid walls restoration, insulation and dehumidification. A traditional solid walled buildings are often referred to as ‘breathing’ structures, meaning that they exchange moisture readily with the indoor and outdoor environment. Where new materials are introduced it is important that this characteristic is taken fully into consideration.

Bauwer material highly vapour permeable, permeability coefficient is 4, it is light weight, Eco-friendly and easy to use, could you please see our reviews at:

http://bauwer.co.uk/Reviews.html

Application process is simple, first day Bauwer Light application and the second day Bauwer Finish which could be later painted with a vapour permeable paint. One bag of Bauwer Light gives you an output of 25L or one square meter coverage at 25mm thickness. Assuming 25mm total application thickness@230sqm you would need 2 pallets with 184 bags of Bauwer Light and 29 bags of Bauwer Finish which would work out about tenner per sqm material costs, achieving a considerable saving vs an option advised in a post above.

Please let me know if you need any further information.

Best regards, Alexander
07553353931

info@bauwer.co.uk
http://bauwer.co.uk
 

franky

New Member
Apart from its got cement in it so it shouldn't be anywhere near a proper old house that was built with lime.
 

Orangemachineman

Well-Known Member
I would use parex heritage lime range
It's the wrong time of year really to start lime jobs with the cold nights coming in


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Bauwer

Well-Known Member
Apart from its got cement in it so it shouldn't be anywhere near a proper old house that was built with lime.
Introduction of impermeable materials that do not maintain breathability of older, lime built houses is never a good idea which might seriously exacerbate existing moisture related problems or create new ones. Examples of impermeable materials includes cement or acrylic renders, cement pointing, EPS insulation, etc. Any of these used on an external wall can trap moisture within the wall and lead to damp and decay.

As mentioned above, Bauwer material is highly vapour permeable, breathable and porous due to lots of air trapped inside thanks to expanded Perlite which is a main component of Bauwer insulation. Perlite is Eco-friendly and one of nature’s most versatile and efficient minerals. Its unique characteristics of being lightweight, sterile, insulating, and fireproof make it an excellent choice for such diverse applications as building insulation, horticulture as well as filter for water or even wine: http://bauwer.co.uk/templates/Default/images/Perlite-House.pdf

Small amount of cement as well as lime are used as a binder in Bauwer product which makes it robust, durable and easy to work with, being only 280kg/m3 hardened density vs 1,500kg/m3 of impermeable cement renders.
I agree that impermeable cement render should not be used in older buildings, but I need to be clear that Bauwer is highly permeable insulating and de-humidifying solution which is perfect for older houses improvement, insulation and de-humidification at the budget cost as well. Growing number of our customers would confirm it, please see more at http://bauwer.co.uk/Reviews.html
 

Bauwer

Well-Known Member
I would use parex heritage lime range
It's the wrong time of year really to start lime jobs with the cold nights coming in

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Parex provides a great range of rendering products. Looking at the heritage lime range there are several differences vs Bauwer:

1) Bauwer being much more lighter, delivering thermal insulating properties and therefore reducing heating bills
2) When compared at £ per 25L volume of product, Bauwer delivers considerable savings, as one bag of Bauwer Light gives you 25L of product sufficient to cover one square meter at 25mm thickness.
3) Higher breathability, vapour permeability coefficient of Bauwer Light is 4
4) Bauwer could be used in high temperature applications as well
 

franky

New Member
You should be fine with lime inside, as long its its not open to the elements, try to keep the rooms at 10 deg C or more, an oil filled radiator in the middle of the room should do the trick.
 

Bauwer

Well-Known Member
That's the closest rival material to our Buawer Light, with a number of positive characteristic, yet there are few differences as well:

Density: Bauwer Light is 2.5 lighter at 280kg/m2 vs. 700kg/m2 of the EcoCork

Air is a poor conductor of heat, the tiny pockets of air trapped in insulation minimise the amount of heat which can pass between the inside and outside of your house. Therefore the lower the density of the insulation, the better insulation value and vice versa. If a material consists of many small pockets of trapped air rather than a large, contiguous volume of air, the ability to transfer heat by convection is greatly reduced. An everyday example is a feather or fibre duvet.

Thermal performance: Bauwer Light is 50% better at 0.068W/m*K vs 0.1 W/m*K of EcoCork

Output from one bag: 25% higher from one bag of Bauwer Light at 25 liters per bag vs 20 liters of EcoCork.
So each bag of Bauwer Light corresponds to 1.25 bags of EcoCork.

Bauwer filer is expanded Perlite which is inorganic non flammable biologically and chemically inert material with thermal value of 0.034W/m*K. Cork is a great Eco-friendly material as well with slightly inferior thermal value of 0.04W/m*K
 

Vincey

Private Member
I'm likeing bauwer and unlike the other sponsors your responses are useful and frequent keep it up!
I agree mate, is there anyone on forum that has used a fair bit on job or jobs that could give a bit of a like review of it,
It looks a great product and I thinking why haven't I got more clued up on it myself to be honest
@Bauwer do you do a finish coat for the internal work ?
 

Orangemachineman

Well-Known Member
That's the closest rival material to our Buawer Light, with a number of positive characteristic, yet there are few differences as well:

Density: Bauwer Light is 2.5 lighter at 280kg/m2 vs. 700kg/m2 of the EcoCork

Air is a poor conductor of heat, the tiny pockets of air trapped in insulation minimise the amount of heat which can pass between the inside and outside of your house. Therefore the lower the density of the insulation, the better insulation value and vice versa. If a material consists of many small pockets of trapped air rather than a large, contiguous volume of air, the ability to transfer heat by convection is greatly reduced. An everyday example is a feather or fibre duvet.

Thermal performance: Bauwer Light is 50% better at 0.068W/m*K vs 0.1 W/m*K of EcoCork

Output from one bag: 25% higher from one bag of Bauwer Light at 25 liters per bag vs 20 liters of EcoCork.
So each bag of Bauwer Light corresponds to 1.25 bags of EcoCork.

Bauwer filer is expanded Perlite which is inorganic non flammable biologically and chemically inert material with thermal value of 0.034W/m*K. Cork is a great Eco-friendly material as well with slightly inferior thermal value of 0.04W/m*K
Great sales pitch there!!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Bauwer

Well-Known Member
I agree mate, is there anyone on forum that has used a fair bit on job or jobs that could give a bit of a like review of it,
It looks a great product and I thinking why haven't I got more clued up on it myself to be honest
@Bauwer do you do a finish coat for the internal work ?
Hi Pete,
Thanks for your comments.

Andy @Plasterers1StopShop did the testing of our product. Also there is a thread on Bauwer experience at:

http://www.plasterersforum.com/threads/bauwer-render-samples.64219/#post-977190

as well as several reviews on out web site:

http://bauwer.co.uk/Reviews.html

Frankly speaking it is always a challenge to get a review as you folks are really busy.

By the way, have you got a chance to try a bag of Bauwer Light I sent you few month ago? ;)

In regard to your question on finish coat for internal work, Bauwer would only make sense if go for internal (or External) wall insulation. The typical process is 1st day Bauwer Light (insulation layer) application and the second day Bauwer Finish (finishing layer) application which later could be painted or decorated by any vapour permeable material.

Could you please see below how it would look after single layer of paint, done @theclemo

The recommended approach is 2-3 layers of paint, so you get a nice looking finish after it is painted

 
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