Installing a new DPC

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keithuk

Private Member
If it controls it then essentially the problem is cured? A wall should be allowed to dry if wet, dehumidifier and heater before re plastering but how often does this happen..in big insurance jobs yes but not in the bread and buter work of a jobbing spread..
Not if you read the small print John :RpS_sneaky: these chemical companies have been around for years ,but the damp companies using their products come and go ,i think that says it all ,all the risk is on the installer not the main supplier
 

Arti

Well-Known Member
if the wall has a cavity the cavity could be full of crud, has the ground level outside been raised above house floor level ? there's a few

defo these are the problems in the majority of cases ive surveyed
 

raggles

Private Member
I worked for PETER COX in the 80's and since then on any and every property i have ever had i would rather hit and miss on on the brick work and put a proper dpm in than inject
 

carlos

Private Member
if the wall has a cavity the cavity could be full of crud, has the ground level outside been raised above house floor level ? there's a few

I mean't an internal wall. Not the inside of an external.

Like the wall between the kitchen and living room.
 

carlos

Private Member
Royal society of chartered surveyors say it does not exist.the injection of liquid chemicals in a period property with lime mortar joints,where the brickwork is continually moving solves exactly what? Temporary at the very least,a breathable damp proof plaster would seem to be more sensible to my simple mind.


Asif I am not trying to pick holes here but, if if does not exist why does every body and his brother insist on a DPM be fitted in every new wall and floor???
 

raggles

Private Member
Asif I am not trying to pick holes here but, if if does not exist why does every body and his brother insist on a DPM be fitted in every new wall and floor???

prob cos no one has the bottle to say right o take it out of the building reg's :RpS_lol:
 

Ianspreader

Active Member
Has anyone done this:hack wall off floor to ceiling let dry out, inject dpc, apply two coats of waterproof plasticiser with salt inhibitor sand a cement and allow to dry and then dot and dab with insulated board? Cheers ian
 

johniosaif

Private Member
Asif I am not trying to pick holes here but, if if does not exist why does every body and his brother insist on a DPM be fitted in every new wall and floor???
Have you heard of ingress, penetrating damp, moisture build up, condensation ?a dpm is designed in a tray form to allow moisture in whatever form to run out wards,a dpm is not for rising damp. You can ask a chartered surveyor, I am simply just a tradesman with the same skills and capacity as yourself Carlos.ps we were always informed that damp,jumps from floor to wall, why would it not then jump a 1mm dpm or a liquid injection, it does not add up at all, but the money from damp proofing is massive, fear tactics, banks insisting on it for mortgage,but oddly they will accept a letter from a surveyor saying it does not exist.thousands of houses are injected every year for no purpose other than milking customers...
 
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Arti

Well-Known Member
Has anyone done this:hack wall off floor to ceiling let dry out, inject dpc, apply two coats of waterproof plasticiser with salt inhibitor sand a cement and allow to dry and then dot and dab with insulated board? Cheers ian

If ive had to hack off floor to ceiling then im normally tanking the wall due to penatrating damp so i wouldnt be injecting. if you wanna dab insi boards over dampproofing you would be better using a membrane system and just dabbing onto that
 

johniosaif

Private Member
if its settled then why do so many people disagree
I get that, but I would side with the professionals in rics ,if its good enough for them then its good enough for me, I know no more than anyone on here but that's which side I pick. The whole thing of rising damp is and always felt wrong to me but I knew no better or had no reason not to go along with it, had plenty of properties injected etc, but watching the damp,proof industry at work, I lost faith completely, most of the directors if not all are off the opinion that rising damp is a myth, there is obviously a problem that causes damp, perhaps its us and what we do,everyday, external rendering, damp proofing,insulation of external walls from the inside, what's everyone's views here on thermal mass...goodnight
 

irish_spread

Private Member
Oh,guys, I am asking this quietly and I will never reveal your answer, does rising exist, or is it like the Loch Ness monster.i have done loads of damp proofing and tanking and then bought the guarantee , they made me smile when they asked did I cut corners,


John, every time you find 'find rising damp lol' give me a ring. If it is 'rising damp Pmsl' I'll give you £100. If its not, and I can't give it antibiotics an stuff and prove its not, you give me £100 plus my days wages. I can't do fairer than that :RpS_thumbup:
 

adapt

Active Member
It all depends on the construction of the property, personally i am not into fast cash drill and inject.

I am in the camp of tanking, the reason is that most of what i see is random stone houses with sand and lime infill.

I tend to think a lot of failed DPC's are more penertrating damp than rising.

It does exist but its very rare.

But it takes years of actually doing the job to see that every job is not the same and making out the magic creams and fluids cure it probably means you are on commission lol.

p.s when you do get a claim on work you will find the chemical company will just send you some product for you to re inject.

If you are good at the job you will never have a claim.
 

carlos

Private Member
Why would a chemical company send you free chemical to re inject. For all they know all you did was hack off and replaster.

I have seen people try and claim on a "chemical guarantee" before. They just get told that the chemical is guaranteed for 30 years, but they cannot guarantee the workmanship of the guy installing it.

Which makes the original guarantee worthless.


Hope that made sense.
 

JamieMac

Member
I worked for PETER COX in the 80's and since then on any and every property i have ever had i would rather hit and miss on on the brick work and put a proper dpm in than inject
m8 is it peter cox from glasgow.you worked 4.av saw there vans when getin materals.
 

JamieMac

Member
Why would a chemical company send you free chemical to re inject. For all they know all you did was hack off and replaster.

I have seen people try and claim on a "chemical guarantee" before. They just get told that the chemical is guaranteed for 30 years, but they cannot guarantee the workmanship of the guy installing it.

Which makes the original guarantee worthless.


Hope that made sense.

very true a dpc is only as good as the guy who done it.
 

lizard821000

New Member
i cant quite understand how rising damp can NOT exists!? surely bricks can absorb moisture , so sat in water long enough water could travel up the brick!? i understand good airflow above this area can dry it out, but thats still "damp rising" no!?

i do a fair bit of work for damp proof companies down my end and use their specs of instillation, they offer their guarantee etc and carry on as normal, iv got a far understanding of why things get wet etc, most time a clear out of the cavity and some airbricks rectify the problem and external ground levels etc... plus removal of contaminated sub straights and salts etc

but say you have an internal wall with 2-3 brick height looking and feeling wet, whats caused that? not "penetrating" damp...
or you could call it "penetrating rising" damp as water has obviously penetrated somewhere and is now rising ....

or would this be down to poor ventilation also!? under the floorboards..... there are so many toos and foos on the subject tbh. it hurts my head lol
 
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johniosaif

Private Member
i cant quite understand how rising damp can NOT exists!? surely bricks can absorb moisture , so sat in water long enough water could travel up the brick!? i understand good airflow above this area can dry it out, but thats still "damp rising" no!?

i do a fair bit of work for damp proof companies down my end and use their specs of instillation, they offer their guarantee etc and carry on as normal, iv got a far understanding of why things get wet etc, most time a clear out of the cavity and some airbricks rectify the problem and external ground levels etc... plus removal of contaminated sub straights and salts etc

but say you have an internal wall with 2-3 brick height looking and feeling wet, whats caused that? not "penetrating" damp...
or you could call it "penetrating rising" damp as water has obviously penetrated somewhere and is now rising ....

or would this be down to poor ventilation also!? under the floorboards..... there are so many toos and foos on the subject tbh. it hurts my head lol
double negatives wont help, no one has yet proven rd exists, rics says it does not, most damp proof companies say they can not offer any evidence that it does..
 

Arti

Well-Known Member
that preservation geezer knows his onions, seen a few of his vid's on you tube........................:RpS_thumbup:
 

lizard821000

New Member
i live in portsmouth where in areas we are actually below sea level in places lol and do a lot of damp work in houses around the shore especially, when there is an ingress of water and the floor is dry i can understand the rate of absorsion into the ground would be quicker than it could climb a wall, but if the ground was already soaked!?

and what about dry rot? moisture must be present there too, so even if you had no rising damp in view and good ventilation underfloor, moisture can still be present no!? leading to dry rot conditions!?

lol dear lord , have i started something, im all ears if peeps want try and explain im wrong.... not saying im right, just dont see how damp cant rise.
 

johniosaif

Private Member
i live in portsmouth where in areas we are actually below sea level in places lol and do a lot of damp work in houses around the shore especially, when there is an ingress of water and the floor is dry i can understand the rate of absorsion into the ground would be quicker than it could climb a wall, but if the ground was already soaked!?

and what about dry rot? moisture must be present there too, so even if you had no rising damp in view and good ventilation underfloor, moisture can still be present no!? leading to dry rot conditions!?

lol dear lord , have i started something, im all ears if peeps want try and explain im wrong.... not saying im right, just dont see how damp cant rise.
one of the points proving rd by the expert was about the salts but in new build salts are in evidence if the building was allowed to get wet during the build..
 

lizard821000

New Member
i think its more to do with products applied on the wall that lets it climb, as in a garden wall with no dcp the wall isnt soaked, just the ones under the ground... hmmm.
 
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