Installing a new DPC

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carlos

Private Member
Does everyone do this their self's or get a firm in to do it for them?

Say your looking at a over-skim job and find a tide mark around the room. Do you try to sort it your self or tell the client to get a firm in to take a look/quote?
 

keithuk

Private Member
If i,m working on any older property ,i always say have you had the damp course checked ,i still only use s/c with waterproofer in it for any patching up ,before skim ,even when they say "we have no damp ":RpS_unsure:
 

JME401

New Member
I do dpc. amount of jobs that we get called to that some 1 has done and not put 1 in or had it checked professionally is huge always get it checked if in dout , it will come bk to you
 

carlos

Private Member
To be fair I work for a Damp firm so do it all the time.

I just wondered if "plasterers" generally did it or not, due to the risk of comebacks, given how problematic it can be.
 

keithuk

Private Member
Let the damp companies have the worry and the risk ,that is in their costing ,don,t miss those days :RpS_crying:
 

johniosaif

Private Member
I always advise and let them decide on the course of action,I hate damp proof firms, find the majority of them on the rough end of the trade , all science and no ability, seen them injecting water, mixing bonding in to speed up the sand/cement, they never plumb or straighten, do the bare minimum but charge big money, give worthless guarantees at the end of the job..
 

johniosaif

Private Member
I have been doing plastering for DPC firms for 10 years and have seen it all.
It's odd with all the guarantees and waffle that a couple of guys turn up who look like the live for special brew, I often have to hack off their work and redo it, the builder says I need their guarantee. Often meant to become a surveyor myself but lost interest as I was earning enough and a bit lazy to do courses..and bit nervous too I must admit..
 

Arti

Well-Known Member
i tell the customer and then do a survey for them being a Kingfisher approved installer and all that ...................:RpS_wink:. most jobs rarely need a chemical DPC its nearly always other more obvious stuff
 

carlos

Private Member
I know what you mean. The pub up the road from me had some damp, the brewery got a firm in to sort it out.

I was talking to the landlord about it all and he had no control over who they used. A surveyor rolled up in a nice clean car in a suit and did the survey. A week later a EU fella rocked up in an old escort with the back seats out to hack off inject and replaster! He was in out done in a day feck knows what he did.
 

keithuk

Private Member
I know what you mean. The pub up the road from me had some damp, the brewery got a firm in to sort it out.

I was talking to the landlord about it all and he had no control over who they used. A surveyor rolled up in a nice clean car in a suit and did the survey. A week later a EU fella rocked up in an old escort with the back seats out to hack off inject and replaster! He was in out done in a day feck knows what he did.
That,s bad Carlos :RpS_angry: always park your nice clean car a few roads down when pricing up :RpS_thumbsup:
 

Arti

Well-Known Member
What did you have to do to become an approved installer or should I ask ,ha haa

just attend there training seminar and then have your 1st 3 jobs assessed by your area rep..............i think the soverign approved installer is the same kind of thing
 

carlos

Private Member
i tell the customer and then do a survey for them being a Kingfisher approved installer and all that ...................:RpS_wink:. most jobs rarely need a chemical DPC its nearly always other more obvious stuff

Yeah but you can use you damp proofer training and sell them 1 anyway..............:RpS_sneaky:
 

Ianspreader

Active Member
I am just plastering a very damp room had a proper company out they installed a chemical d.p.c and wrote a spec and supplied chemicals for us to follow and they guarantee it aswell so we all do well out of it
 

johniosaif

Private Member
Oh,guys, I am asking this quietly and I will never reveal your answer, does rising exist, or is it like the Loch Ness monster.i have done loads of damp proofing and tanking and then bought the guarantee , they made me smile when they asked did I cut corners,
 

keithuk

Private Member
I am just plastering a very damp room had a proper company out they installed a chemical d.p.c and wrote a spec and supplied chemicals for us to follow and they guarantee it aswell so we all do well out of it
until it goes wrong and there is a call back ,first port of call is you :RpS_crying: hope this is not the case ,but over the years i have seen alot of this ,the money for the damp companies is in the dpc ,not the plastering ,how can they guarantee your work ?
 

carlos

Private Member
Oh,guys, I am asking this quietly and I will never reveal your answer, does rising exist, or is it like the Loch Ness monster.i have done loads of damp proofing and tanking and then bought the guarantee , they made me smile when they asked did I cut corners,

I don't know mate. All I can say is when an internal wall is damp 300mm up where else can it of come from?
 

carlos

Private Member
until it goes wrong and there is a call back ,first port of call is you :RpS_crying: hope this is not the case ,but over the years i have seen alot of this ,the money for the damp companies is in the dpc ,not the plastering ,how can they guarantee your work ?


Seen this happen loads of times. The second there is a call back, where the plastering was done by someone else its all there fault. As said no one will guarantee other peoples work
 

johniosaif

Private Member
I don't know mate. All I can say is when an internal wall is damp 300mm up where else can it of come from?
Royal society of chartered surveyors say it does not exist.the injection of liquid chemicals in a period property with lime mortar joints,where the brickwork is continually moving solves exactly what? Temporary at the very least,a breathable damp proof plaster would seem to be more sensible to my simple mind.
 

Ianspreader

Active Member
Yer I know what u mean I don't know how he can to be honest but we are working for a builder so should be alright I done my apprenticeship on a damp company and we had to do all of it to guarantee it but to be honest just don't cut corners and all should be ok lol
 

keithuk

Private Member
Royal society of chartered surveyors say it does not exist.the injection of liquid chemicals in a period property with lime mortar joints,where the brickwork is continually moving solves exactly what? Temporary at the very least,a breathable damp proof plaster would seem to be more sensible to my simple mind.
A liquid DPC ,needs the back up of new render to work .IMO and i was always told it will only control rising damp ,not cure it
 

johniosaif

Private Member
Damp proof guarantee, customer rings damp company office if they still exist six months later,the damp company says its £400 call out fee, refundable if the damp is down to us, they send a surveyor, he blames everything but their work, ok ,you finally get them to come back after a solicitors letter or court warning, they then say, the room or rooms need to be cleared, the skirtings and arkithraves need to be removed, curtains etc to be removed before they can start ,all this at the customers expense,if they do remove and redo a section, the customer has to refit skirtings and arkithraves and reprint at their own expense.ps one nail or screw hole can negate a guarantee..
 

raggles

Private Member
I don't know mate. All I can say is when an internal wall is damp 300mm up where else can it of come from?

if the wall has a cavity the cavity could be full of crud, has the ground level outside been raised above house floor level ? there's a few
 

johniosaif

Private Member
A liquid DPC ,needs the back up of new render to work .IMO and i was always told it will only control rising damp ,not cure it
If it controls it then essentially the problem is cured? A wall should be allowed to dry if wet, dehumidifier and heater before re plastering but how often does this happen..in big insurance jobs yes but not in the bread and buter work of a jobbing spread..
 

raggles

Private Member
I know a builder who injects the walls of farm cottages and he will not accept that drilling 50mm into a 500 to 600 mm solid stone wall on either side and injecting them is not the right way forward:RpS_crying:
 
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