HMRC and what they can find.

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imago

Private Member
There have been a few threads about HMRC. What they know, how much time and resource they have to look and whether they can dig out the info on 'small fry'.

Well here's a good write up about their 'connect' program. The sources they have access to makes interesting reading

"

Sources of data used by Connect

There are more than 30 different databases available in Connect for analysis although HMRC does not disclose all its sources of information.

The databases include the following.

  • Tax returns (including VAT, PAYE, income tax and corporation tax returns).
  • Bank accounts and pensions.
  • Credit reference agencies.
  • Credit and debit card accounts.
  • Online payment providers such as PayPal.
  • Foreign tax jurisdictions (including treaties and automatic exchange agreements) and the common reporting standard.
  • Government agencies such as Companies House, the Land Registry and the Border Agency.
  • Online social networking.
  • Property websites such as Zoopla and Rightmove.
  • Amazon, eBay, Gumtree and similar sales websites.
  • Google Street View.
  • Council tax records.
  • DVLA records.
  • DWP records.
  • Electoral roll.
  • Insurance companies.
  • Charities Commission.
  • Flight sales and passenger information.

What leads to an HMRC investigation?

In the past, HMRC enquiries were often triggered by a tip-off to the department by a disgruntled employee or by a former spouse or were random enquiries. Today, enquiries in the majority of cases (over 90%) are triggered by information and analysis generated by Connect.
"
 

Nicm

Well-Known Member
There have been a few threads about HMRC. What they know, how much time and resource they have to look and whether they can dig out the info on 'small fry'.

Well here's a good write up about their 'connect' program. The sources they have access to makes interesting reading

"

Sources of data used by Connect

There are more than 30 different databases available in Connect for analysis although HMRC does not disclose all its sources of information.

The databases include the following.

  • Tax returns (including VAT, PAYE, income tax and corporation tax returns).
  • Bank accounts and pensions.
  • Credit reference agencies.
  • Credit and debit card accounts.
  • Online payment providers such as PayPal.
  • Foreign tax jurisdictions (including treaties and automatic exchange agreements) and the common reporting standard.
  • Government agencies such as Companies House, the Land Registry and the Border Agency.
  • Online social networking.
  • Property websites such as Zoopla and Rightmove.
  • Amazon, eBay, Gumtree and similar sales websites.
  • Google Street View.
  • Council tax records.
  • DVLA records.
  • DWP records.
  • Electoral roll.
  • Insurance companies.
  • Charities Commission.
  • Flight sales and passenger information.

What leads to an HMRC investigation?

In the past, HMRC enquiries were often triggered by a tip-off to the department by a disgruntled employee or by a former spouse or were random enquiries. Today, enquiries in the majority of cases (over 90%) are triggered by information and analysis generated by Connect.
"
You trying to frighten the life out of everyone here?.:frenetico:
 

Bagrat

Well-Known Member
There have been a few threads about HMRC. What they know, how much time and resource they have to look and whether they can dig out the info on 'small fry'.

Well here's a good write up about their 'connect' program. The sources they have access to makes interesting reading

"

Sources of data used by Connect

There are more than 30 different databases available in Connect for analysis although HMRC does not disclose all its sources of information.

The databases include the following.

  • Tax returns (including VAT, PAYE, income tax and corporation tax returns).
  • Bank accounts and pensions.
  • Credit reference agencies.
  • Credit and debit card accounts.
  • Online payment providers such as PayPal.
  • Foreign tax jurisdictions (including treaties and automatic exchange agreements) and the common reporting standard.
  • Government agencies such as Companies House, the Land Registry and the Border Agency.
  • Online social networking.
  • Property websites such as Zoopla and Rightmove.
  • Amazon, eBay, Gumtree and similar sales websites.
  • Google Street View.
  • Council tax records.
  • DVLA records.
  • DWP records.
  • Electoral roll.
  • Insurance companies.
  • Charities Commission.
  • Flight sales and passenger information.

What leads to an HMRC investigation?

In the past, HMRC enquiries were often triggered by a tip-off to the department by a disgruntled employee or by a former spouse or were random enquiries. Today, enquiries in the majority of cases (over 90%) are triggered by information and analysis generated by Connect.
"
There also logged in under a alias no doubt.
 

Monkey Boy

Well-Known Member
Pay Day Money GIF
 

Brimstone

Well-Known Member
Good website if you can be arsed to read it - especially scary are the decisions on what is meant by "deliberate errors" - even if you try to be honest & declare it elsewhere because the computer does not have a box in the right place.
-"You knew it was in the wrong box, therefore it was Deliberate = intention not to pay tax (does not need proof) = 20 yr back dated investigation instead of 4 years for a paper return"
 

owls

Private Member
Do your books, do everything by the book, pay your taxes, you’ve then nothing to worry about.
Hmrc are the most organised mob about, to think otherwise is naive.
In a digital age don’t believe they don’t have the resources as they do.
I was investigated a few years ago as regards vat (purely by chance, as they do). I’d done nothing a miss but the whole experience was stressful and went on for a year.
I got my solicitor involved and he said they are doing nothing wrong that’s the powers they have. Lads that do cash jobs etc or on the fiddle need there head looking at.
 

imago

Private Member
There F*****g bullys...hard as nails on average joe and spineless T***s amazon, Starbucks etc it F*****g stinks
I was told (by my accountant) that they have a budget for their legal fees. So they can bury someone at our end of the scale without a problem, but the likes of Amazon can drag a case out with appeals etc to the point where HMRC can't afford to fight it as they'd run out of budget.
 

zombie

Private Member
I was told (by my accountant) that they have a budget for their legal fees. So they can bury someone at our end of the scale without a problem, but the likes of Amazon can drag a case out with appeals etc to the point where HMRC can't afford to fight it as they'd run out of budget.

Sounds about right me & @John j are guna go halves on no win no pay free solicitor
 

SmoothCriminal

Well-Known Member
So they are hard on small earners yet massive corporations are getting away with murder. Australia news were on about how the politic sector have been found out giving themselves massive bonuses through this whole pandemic an that’s the reason they don’t want it to end. Actually sickening how this world works an the more you look into it the worse it gets. Anyone watched Seaspiracy on Netflix!
 

raggles

Private Member
So they are hard on small earners yet massive corporations are getting away with murder. Australia news were on about how the politic sector have been found out giving themselves massive bonuses through this whole pandemic an that’s the reason they don’t want it to end. Actually sickening how this world works an the more you look into it the worse it gets. Anyone watched Seaspiracy on Netflix!
Seaspiracy has already been criticized for inaccuracies apparently and, by proper scientists.
 

JessThePlasterer

Queen Jess Elizabeth I
If they look at your expenditure then they’ll probably think I’m Tiny Tim’s cousin, feel sorry for me and send me some dough! :ROFLMAO:
 

JessThePlasterer

Queen Jess Elizabeth I
Unlikely. They'll see that you're up North, haven't bought any clogs, but have bought a house = loaded (relatively speaking).

Constance Wu GIF by Crazy Rich Asians
Si told me I look like something out of Oliver Twist and in a fit of desperation threw his credit card at me and told me to knock myself out with a new wardrobe!

that was months ago, I’ve not touched his credit card . Absolutely hate shopping :X3::ROFLMAO:
 

paulf

Well-Known Member
Si told me I look like something out of Oliver Twist and in a fit of desperation threw his credit card at me and told me to knock myself out with a new wardrobe!

that was months ago, I’ve not touched his credit card . Absolutely hate shopping :X3::ROFLMAO:

You need to stop wearing that frilly shower cap you wear to work. :sisi:
9510-14081.jpg
 

imago

Private Member
My mum said to me today, what do you want for your birthday? Should I get you something girly for a change?

could hear my dad in the background saying “get her some under-seal for van”

:ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
My mum used to get me some absolutely fcuking mental stuff for my birthday. When I was in my 30's I had a fixer upper house (all I could afford after a relationship went tits up). All the plaster off, no back wall etc etc. She got me a set of place mats for the dining table I didn't have, in a dining room which didn't exist. :aburrido:

Years ago I suggested we all do donations to animal charities instead of presents.
 

John j

Mono Don
My mum used to get me some absolutely fcuking mental stuff for my birthday. When I was in my 30's I had a fixer upper house (all I could afford after a relationship went tits up). All the plaster off, no back wall etc etc. She got me a set of place mats for the dining table I didn't have, in a dining room which didn't exist. :aburrido:

Years ago I suggested we all do donations to animal charities instead of presents.
What place mats were they
 
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