Hi - introducing myself and my 8x4 van conversion.

#1
Morning Gents (and ladies ?)

After a quick browse of the forum I can see that I'm going to get mullered whatever I post so I'll get straight to it.
Firstly I'm not a plasterer :eek::eek: I'm an engineer who has been playing with planes, trains and automobiles (and bikes, trucks and boats) for far too long. I will never understand how you make that brown stuff stick and how you make it so flat.:rock:

I'm dipping a toe in your world because I am in the process of modifying a Nissan NV200 van to take 8x4 sheets under a suspended floor and I need to pick your brains and collect some feedback. (Apologies if I should now be posting in a different section but there was no point in saying 'Hi' without saying why I'm here). It's a long story as to how I got involved in this but there are 2 interesting points about the NV200 you should know:
1. It's not long enough to take an 8x4. That's why I'm modifying it. It's getting longer.
2. Although it's a diesel it is also available as the eNV200 - the 'e' signifying that it has an electric drivetrain - identical to the one in the Nissan Leaf. If you work in 'the smoke' you'll be well aware that legislation is heading your way that will limit the use of diesels in London and similar restrictions may be coming to other city centres before too long.
I already have a potential market for this conversion - or a close variation of it - and I wondered if plasterers - and chippies - would also be interested.

So my questions are 1. What do you reckon ? and 2. On average how many boards and bags of skim do you like to start the day with ? It's a relatively small van so the payload is around 700Kg. At the moment I'm looking at supplying new/nearly new vehicles with the conversion - and the suspended floor - but if I can keep the price down it may also be available as a retrofit. Obviously whether the van is diesel or electric makes no difference.

Please advise if I should post this in the equipment or general sections, thanks for your time.....and muller away !(y)
 

zombie

Private Member
#2
Morning Gents (and ladies ?)

After a quick browse of the forum I can see that I'm going to get mullered whatever I post so I'll get straight to it.
Firstly I'm not a plasterer :eek::eek: I'm an engineer who has been playing with planes, trains and automobiles (and bikes, trucks and boats) for far too long. I will never understand how you make that brown stuff stick and how you make it so flat.:rock:

I'm dipping a toe in your world because I am in the process of modifying a Nissan NV200 van to take 8x4 sheets under a suspended floor and I need to pick your brains and collect some feedback. (Apologies if I should now be posting in a different section but there was no point in saying 'Hi' without saying why I'm here). It's a long story as to how I got involved in this but there are 2 interesting points about the NV200 you should know:
1. It's not long enough to take an 8x4. That's why I'm modifying it. It's getting longer.
2. Although it's a diesel it is also available as the eNV200 - the 'e' signifying that it has an electric drivetrain - identical to the one in the Nissan Leaf. If you work in 'the smoke' you'll be well aware that legislation is heading your way that will limit the use of diesels in London and similar restrictions may be coming to other city centres before too long.
I already have a potential market for this conversion - or a close variation of it - and I wondered if plasterers - and chippies - would also be interested.

So my questions are 1. What do you reckon ? and 2. On average how many boards and bags of skim do you like to start the day with ? It's a relatively small van so the payload is around 700Kg. At the moment I'm looking at supplying new/nearly new vehicles with the conversion - and the suspended floor - but if I can keep the price down it may also be available as a retrofit. Obviously whether the van is diesel or electric makes no difference.

Please advise if I should post this in the equipment or general sections, thanks for your time.....and muller away !(y)
Hi,

Il make this sime for you any van ive bought for work i take a tape measure and check that boards will fit in th van.

If it doesnt i wouldnt buy!

Im sure this is what any trafedman would do with a vehicle they intend on using every day!

Madness!
 

John j

Well-Known Member
#3
I always get transits as allways seem to get 8 x 4 in short wheel base.

If not I wouldn't pay some f**k*r to extend my van i.d just get em delivered or 6x 3.s or another van
 

raggles

Private Member
#4
The suspended floor mod you are talking about a fair few people will have already done themselves on various different types of van and, due to the skill set of the trades you mention it isn't that difficult a project to tackle. I see where you are coming from with the electric vehicle thing though. If you already have a potential market for them good luck with your venture.
 

Stevieo

Well-Known Member
#5
Morning Gents (and ladies ?)

After a quick browse of the forum I can see that I'm going to get mullered whatever I post so I'll get straight to it.
Firstly I'm not a plasterer :eek::eek: I'm an engineer who has been playing with planes, trains and automobiles (and bikes, trucks and boats) for far too long. I will never understand how you make that brown stuff stick and how you make it so flat.:rock:

I'm dipping a toe in your world because I am in the process of modifying a Nissan NV200 van to take 8x4 sheets under a suspended floor and I need to pick your brains and collect some feedback. (Apologies if I should now be posting in a different section but there was no point in saying 'Hi' without saying why I'm here). It's a long story as to how I got involved in this but there are 2 interesting points about the NV200 you should know:
1. It's not long enough to take an 8x4. That's why I'm modifying it. It's getting longer.
2. Although it's a diesel it is also available as the eNV200 - the 'e' signifying that it has an electric drivetrain - identical to the one in the Nissan Leaf. If you work in 'the smoke' you'll be well aware that legislation is heading your way that will limit the use of diesels in London and similar restrictions may be coming to other city centres before too long.
I already have a potential market for this conversion - or a close variation of it - and I wondered if plasterers - and chippies - would also be interested.

So my questions are 1. What do you reckon ? and 2. On average how many boards and bags of skim do you like to start the day with ? It's a relatively small van so the payload is around 700Kg. At the moment I'm looking at supplying new/nearly new vehicles with the conversion - and the suspended floor - but if I can keep the price down it may also be available as a retrofit. Obviously whether the van is diesel or electric makes no difference.

Please advise if I should post this in the equipment or general sections, thanks for your time.....and muller away !(y)
So instead of buying a van that's actually suitable you want to get all BA Baracas?

Can you put armour on mine?

 

Mouldyoldspudgun

Well-Known Member
#6
If it can only carry 700 kilos it’s not enough for us each board or bag is 25 kilos then you have the masses of tools, hop ups, steps, drills, transformers and all the other s**t we carry about
 

essexandy

Private Member
#8
Morning Gents (and ladies ?)

After a quick browse of the forum I can see that I'm going to get mullered whatever I post so I'll get straight to it.
Firstly I'm not a plasterer :eek::eek: I'm an engineer who has been playing with planes, trains and automobiles (and bikes, trucks and boats) for far too long. I will never understand how you make that brown stuff stick and how you make it so flat.:rock:

I'm dipping a toe in your world because I am in the process of modifying a Nissan NV200 van to take 8x4 sheets under a suspended floor and I need to pick your brains and collect some feedback. (Apologies if I should now be posting in a different section but there was no point in saying 'Hi' without saying why I'm here). It's a long story as to how I got involved in this but there are 2 interesting points about the NV200 you should know:
1. It's not long enough to take an 8x4. That's why I'm modifying it. It's getting longer.
2. Although it's a diesel it is also available as the eNV200 - the 'e' signifying that it has an electric drivetrain - identical to the one in the Nissan Leaf. If you work in 'the smoke' you'll be well aware that legislation is heading your way that will limit the use of diesels in London and similar restrictions may be coming to other city centres before too long.
I already have a potential market for this conversion - or a close variation of it - and I wondered if plasterers - and chippies - would also be interested.

So my questions are 1. What do you reckon ? and 2. On average how many boards and bags of skim do you like to start the day with ? It's a relatively small van so the payload is around 700Kg. At the moment I'm looking at supplying new/nearly new vehicles with the conversion - and the suspended floor - but if I can keep the price down it may also be available as a retrofit. Obviously whether the van is diesel or electric makes no difference.

Please advise if I should post this in the equipment or general sections, thanks for your time.....and muller away !(y)
I'm pretty sure that I read that both the Transit and Vito are currently being tested in an electric format.
I'd say that you're f**k*d before you start.
As others have said, 700kg isn't really enough for a lot of guys.
 
#10
your traffic cops must be easy going u wouldn't get 2 mile up in Scotland like that
 

Vincey

Private Member
#12
Morning Gents (and ladies ?)

After a quick browse of the forum I can see that I'm going to get mullered whatever I post so I'll get straight to it.
Firstly I'm not a plasterer :eek::eek: I'm an engineer who has been playing with planes, trains and automobiles (and bikes, trucks and boats) for far too long. I will never understand how you make that brown stuff stick and how you make it so flat.:rock:

I'm dipping a toe in your world because I am in the process of modifying a Nissan NV200 van to take 8x4 sheets under a suspended floor and I need to pick your brains and collect some feedback. (Apologies if I should now be posting in a different section but there was no point in saying 'Hi' without saying why I'm here). It's a long story as to how I got involved in this but there are 2 interesting points about the NV200 you should know:
1. It's not long enough to take an 8x4. That's why I'm modifying it. It's getting longer.
2. Although it's a diesel it is also available as the eNV200 - the 'e' signifying that it has an electric drivetrain - identical to the one in the Nissan Leaf. If you work in 'the smoke' you'll be well aware that legislation is heading your way that will limit the use of diesels in London and similar restrictions may be coming to other city centres before too long.
I already have a potential market for this conversion - or a close variation of it - and I wondered if plasterers - and chippies - would also be interested.

So my questions are 1. What do you reckon ? and 2. On average how many boards and bags of skim do you like to start the day with ? It's a relatively small van so the payload is around 700Kg. At the moment I'm looking at supplying new/nearly new vehicles with the conversion - and the suspended floor - but if I can keep the price down it may also be available as a retrofit. Obviously whether the van is diesel or electric makes no difference.

Please advise if I should post this in the equipment or general sections, thanks for your time.....and muller away !(y)
Welcome
This interesting me a lot tbh, I looked into getting the nv200 before I bought vivaro long wheel base , the cab was nice but overall it was just to small if u could widen and lengthen it to same as vivaro lwb you on to a winner
The nv3000 or what ever is the next model up was /is to big though
The new Peugeot I notice have changed to nearly the same as vivaro.
Swb transit and vivaro are to small for 8ft x 4ft boards they just fit in but it’s pathetic the space there isn’t
 

John j

Well-Known Member
#13
Welcome
This interesting me a lot tbh, I looked into getting the nv200 before I bought vivaro long wheel base , the cab was nice but overall it was just to small if u could widen and lengthen it to same as vivaro lwb you on to a winner
The nv3000 or what ever is the next model up was /is to big though
The new Peugeot I notice have changed to nearly the same as vivaro.
Swb transit and vivaro are to small for 8ft x 4ft boards they just fit in but it’s pathetic the space there isn’t
Always managed with swb transit . Your only allowed so much weight. Like how some put floating floors in so 8x4s slide nice between wheel arches
 

Vincey

Private Member
#14
Always managed with swb transit . Your only allowed so much weight. Like how some put floating floors in so 8x4s slide nice between wheel arches
True mate forgot about floating floor
I meant standing upright apologises
 

John j

Well-Known Member
#15
True mate forgot about floating floor
I meant standing upright apologises
Yeah in new transits you have to stand em up right against side door as they won't fit behind driver
 
#16
Thanks for the replies gents - I'll answer some of your points.
The payload is the obvious limitation which is why I wondered how many boards and bags you might take to a site each day - assuming you're not on a big site where everything is delivered. Is 10 boards and 10 bags of skim a days work ? ('Scuse my ignorance - I couldn't even make a guess). I realise that's 500kg so not much left for your other kit.
There are other electric vans on the market and I guess the Transit and the Vito will take 8x4 but they won't be cheap. I saw the electric LDV last year and the salesman coughed a bit and muttered something about £70k !!
The eNV200 is c.£20k and our 8x4 conversion will be around £7k.

I'm surprised suspended floors aren't more common - seems like the obvious way to do it although then you'd lose some of the very funny photos of van abuse.:)

The armour idea looks good although that RSJ would murder the range.

I know it's a bit of a niche market and fitting the 8x4s in was only an after thought once we'd done the original design but I still think it will work for some people in some situations. If you cover a small patch, in a built up area full of Victorian streets. Or if you usually only do small jobs that don't need masses of materials.
And if you work in central London you soon won't have a choice.

I'll post some pics when the van is nearing completion and next time I need a plasterer I now know where to start looking.
Cheers
Andrew
 
#17
Yeah in new transits you have to stand em up right against side door as they won't fit behind driver
We can get 14 sheets of it in our van
Ike that plus all the other stuff goes on the other side and the weights no problem even on one side.
 
#18
Thanks for the replies gents - I'll answer some of your points.
The payload is the obvious limitation which is why I wondered how many boards and bags you might take to a site each day - assuming you're not on a big site where everything is delivered. Is 10 boards and 10 bags of skim a days work ? ('Scuse my ignorance - I couldn't even make a guess). I realise that's 500kg so not much left for your other kit.
There are other electric vans on the market and I guess the Transit and the Vito will take 8x4 but they won't be cheap. I saw the electric LDV last year and the salesman coughed a bit and muttered something about £70k !!
The eNV200 is c.£20k and our 8x4 conversion will be around £7k.

I'm surprised suspended floors aren't more common - seems like the obvious way to do it although then you'd lose some of the very funny photos of van abuse.:)

The armour idea looks good although that RSJ would murder the range.

I know it's a bit of a niche market and fitting the 8x4s in was only an after thought once we'd done the original design but I still think it will work for some people in some situations. If you cover a small patch, in a built up area full of Victorian streets. Or if you usually only do small jobs that don't need masses of materials.
And if you work in central London you soon won't have a choice.

I'll post some pics when the van is nearing completion and next time I need a plasterer I now know where to start looking.
Cheers
Andrew
You are right about the niche market, i can’t see a contractor buying these because of the weight carrying issue but maybe you should aim at the niche market but in all trades. It would work for a small jobbing builder but it definitely wouldn’t work for us, I don’t want to be going to the builders merchant every day so when I go I grab a lot of stuff if you raise the floor to carry gyproc underneath you are cutting the head height which we need waterbutts and mixers spring to mind if you make the board carrier to carry ten gyproc you isolate chippies who may need to carry inch plywood so how much head height are you going to lose?
I have also known people rig up their own device like yours and end up ripping it out because of s**t getting in their which rips the paper on the board and breaks the corners so it isn’t as straight forward as you think. As for not being able to work in London that is a blessing as far as I am concerned and if it really got to the point where no one would travel into London or any city because of emissions, things would soon change or cities would become more run down than they are shops and businesses would have no supplies council revenue would drop firms would move out and the big cities would die