Hello, please help.

Wornoutboot

New Member
Well not much else on at Chrimbo, is there. Not a plasterer, more a plastering groupie, as I have an undying respect for your trade, ever since my late bestie, an artisan plasterer pointed out his brilliance to me more than once over a pint, then proved it by sorting out my walls and ceilings, flat as. I'm here picking brains a bit, as he showed me the basics, but its got a bit more serious since he went to plasterers heaven, and left me to do part 2 on my tod, and at my age too.
My question to start is.... I'm plaster boarding out a low loft space wall (650 to 720 mm) in France, lower edges are no problem as they are flat and level to the floor boards but the upper edge comes up to wooden beams all the way round, some of which ARE square (less than 25%), the rest is rough hewn timber with intermittent round or angled edge, which I want to leave exposed.
This means, as I see it, either, stopping the board below the beam at same level as attached stud and plaster or caulk filling to smooth up to the beam, or chamfering back edge of plasterboard to meet angle/round of beam then fixing in with an adhesive before filling. I'm planning to cover beams edges which have already been 1st coat varnished with 14 day masking tape, to avoid plaster/caulk ingress and staining, then cut and lift tape, but am just wondering if either of the above can be trumped by some knowledge one of you might have.
There are no straight lines, no equal distances or 2 measurements the same; nor full round or ovals, nearly every few mm the shapes of the beams change, as befits timber hand cut and placed over 100 years ago, by rural artisans. On this I don't think draw or flex will be a problem?
Its an interesting challenge for a pro, and I'm going to give it a crack as an am, and hope, with me ol' mates spirit in my bonce, it looks nice once done. So any advice gratefully received.
 

Retired Spread

Well-Known Member
giphy (51).gif
 
Well not much else on at Chrimbo, is there. Not a plasterer, more a plastering groupie, as I have an undying respect for your trade, ever since my late bestie, an artisan plasterer pointed out his brilliance to me more than once over a pint, then proved it by sorting out my walls and ceilings, flat as. I'm here picking brains a bit, as he showed me the basics, but its got a bit more serious since he went to plasterers heaven, and left me to do part 2 on my tod, and at my age too.
My question to start is.... I'm plaster boarding out a low loft space wall (650 to 720 mm) in France, lower edges are no problem as they are flat and level to the floor boards but the upper edge comes up to wooden beams all the way round, some of which ARE square (less than 25%), the rest is rough hewn timber with intermittent round or angled edge, which I want to leave exposed.
This means, as I see it, either, stopping the board below the beam at same level as attached stud and plaster or caulk filling to smooth up to the beam, or chamfering back edge of plasterboard to meet angle/round of beam then fixing in with an adhesive before filling. I'm planning to cover beams edges which have already been 1st coat varnished with 14 day masking tape, to avoid plaster/caulk ingress and staining, then cut and lift tape, but am just wondering if either of the above can be trumped by some knowledge one of you might have.
There are no straight lines, no equal distances or 2 measurements the same; nor full round or ovals, nearly every few mm the shapes of the beams change, as befits timber hand cut and placed over 100 years ago, by rural artisans. On this I don't think draw or flex will be a problem?
Its an interesting challenge for a pro, and I'm going to give it a crack as an am, and hope, with me ol' mates spirit in my bonce, it looks nice once done. So any advice gratefully received.
Best bet would probably be go back to sleep!
 

Wornoutboot

New Member
Thanks Jess great idea for across beams, but in my "long ass (prefer arse) post" I guess I omitted to describe that these are upper board edges running along the length of these beams. Involving sculpting or filling 30 to 60 mm in some places. If I chamfer up to 15 degrees then it'll weaken the board I'd guess, even with a good adhesive/filler behind? Or I just do straight edges along stud and use best sandable filler I can find.
I'll try a pic if its not going to bore the boys on the pop?
 

Wornoutboot

New Member
Won't rise to a poor fella from Leeds having a short attention span. You must leave the ground early quite a bit. Oops, I rose.
 
D

Deleted member 40920

Guest
Thanks Jess great idea for across beams, but in my "long ass (prefer arse) post" I guess I omitted to describe that these are upper board edges running along the length of these beams. Involving sculpting or filling 30 to 60 mm in some places. If I chamfer up to 15 degrees then it'll weaken the board I'd guess, even with a good adhesive/filler behind? Or I just do straight edges along stud and use best sandable filler I can find.
I'll try a pic if its not going to bore the boys on the pop?
I honestly have no idea what you're on about
 

Wornoutboot

New Member
Pleased to oblige. White dots outer curve of adzed beam. Red dots line directly above stud to either board or fill up to, allowing beam to stay partially or fully exposed.
PC150045 (4)_LI.jpg
 
Last edited:

martinemj

Well-Known Member
If you plasterboard to edge of the timber either on an angle small pieces plasterboard or fill if less than 10mm with plasterboard adhesive...
If it's proud you can round it back to beam
(you won't find bonding or multi in France ...).

Ps....is studwork chevron by any chance .....terrible stuff..
 

Stevieo

Royal Spin Doctor
Thanks Jess great idea for across beams, but in my "long ass (prefer arse) post" I guess I omitted to describe that these are upper board edges running along the length of these beams. Involving sculpting or filling 30 to 60 mm in some places. If I chamfer up to 15 degrees then it'll weaken the board I'd guess, even with a good adhesive/filler behind? Or I just do straight edges along stud and use best sandable filler I can find.
I'll try a pic if its not going to bore the boys on the pop?
If you'd included a few pictures then you wouldn't have had to describe anything at all would you you daft c**t?

Happy Xmas
 

Wornoutboot

New Member
If you plasterboard to edge of the timber either on an angle small pieces plasterboard or fill if less than 10mm with plasterboard adhesive...
If it's proud you can round it back to beam
(you won't find bonding or multi in France ...).

Ps....is studwork chevron by any chance .....terrible stuff..
Thanks. Nope not chevron. Know it is, but ta for heads up. Bonding and multi goes down with me. We got that on other house.
Had thought about fill with Toupret, then sand.
 

JessThePlasterer

Queen Jess Elizabeth I
Pleased to oblige. White dots outer curve of adzed beam. Red dots line directly above stud to either board or fill up to, allowing beam to stay partially or fully exposed. View attachment 43028
Ah I think I see. So this is going to have a cottagy feel to it? In that case I’d prob chamfer the board a bit maybe. Take the board slightly lower than the beam and bond the edge. It’ll be a bit proud but wouldn’t matter. Could always scrim small bit of wood under the binding to try avoid cracking.
0334694D-CCE4-499A-A33C-D2652CDFCD66.jpeg
F38078D3-AE14-463E-A37E-8FAF6B367199.jpeg


This is s/c and skim but what I mean by cottagy type finish round the steps as yours would be round the beam
 

Wornoutboot

New Member
Cheers for coming back at it. That looks about the idea. Had scrim to beam down on menu, and board chamfer (scrim to any lost backing) before bond. Another site recommended using 50mm Kleenedge masking along the beam before work, do bond/fill and smooth, then cut scribe and lift excess Kleenedge to leave a clean plastered edge all along. I'll trial in space behind future cupboards.
 

JessThePlasterer

Queen Jess Elizabeth I
Cheers for coming back at it. That looks about the idea. Had scrim to beam down on menu, and board chamfer (scrim to any lost backing) before bond. Another site recommended using 50mm Kleenedge masking along the beam before work, do bond/fill and smooth, then cut scribe and lift excess Kleenedge to leave a clean plastered edge all along. I'll trial in space behind future cupboards.
Yeah tape can be good. Continually cleaning with a brush and water good too

I used masking tape here on this little return. Kept the line neat

4339397B-4D58-47FA-B8A8-A4F0F6685B4C.jpeg
 
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