Glancing / critical lighting or plastering issue?

I'd bet it looks completely different without the sun shining down it just look on here how many times this issue comes up it's every week I'm not saying it's good work post some more pictures when the light isn't shining down them that's the only way to judge it fairly
Id agree with you if it was render but come on the odd blemish fine. Thats horrendous
 

essexandy

The Lake Governor
I'd bet it looks completely different without the sun shining down it just look on here how many times this issue comes up it's every week I'm not saying it's good work post some more pictures when the light isn't shining down them that's the only way to judge it fairly
I generally agree with you, but if you zoom in on the lower part of that wall there's something weird going on. To be honest it doesn't even look like internal plaster work? I'm wondering if this is just another silly windup?
 

Elite exteriors

Well-Known Member
I generally agree with you, but if you zoom in on the lower part of that wall there's something weird going on. To be honest it doesn't even look like internal plaster work? I'm wondering if this is just another silly windup?
Yeah it does look bad I didn't bother zooming in I was just pointing out it's a common thing that comes up on here light shining down wall looking really bad
 

laeht22

New Member
I generally agree with you, but if you zoom in on the lower part of that wall there's something weird going on. To be honest it doesn't even look like internal plaster work? I'm wondering if this is just another silly windup?
Can assure you this is genuine. That's one of the finished internal walls of my large new build, being built by large contractor. The overspray at the bottom near the shadow gap is from a paint sprayer.
 

essexandy

The Lake Governor
Can assure you this is genuine. That's one of the finished internal walls of my large new build, being built by large contractor. The overspray at the bottom near the shadow gap is from a paint sprayer.
So in fact it's hard to know if the irregularities are caused by the plasterwork or the paint being sprayed. You would be amazed at how badly applied paint can make the plasterwork look at fault.
 

laeht22

New Member
So in fact it's hard to know if the irregularities are caused by the plasterwork or the paint being sprayed. You would be amazed at how badly applied paint can make the plasterwork look at fault.
I think it's fair to say that sprayed paint wouldn't cause that level of irregularities. We are having to look at a non-reflective alternative paint to see if it can disguise the finish but it's not a miracle worker. Plus you can feel the level of undulations in the plaster.
 

Elite exteriors

Well-Known Member
It does look better without light on it but is that really a fair and realistic way to judge it? There's always going to be light in a building and on walls at different times of the day. We were not expecting perfection but were also not expecting it to look like this.
Yes you can't judge work with glancing light shining down it or by something like shining a torch down it ,if its crap in natural light without anything shining down it its crap
 

Elite exteriors

Well-Known Member
It does look better without light on it but is that really a fair and realistic way to judge it? There's always going to be light in a building and on walls at different times of the day. We were not expecting perfection but were also not expecting it to look like this.
Post more pictures without light shining down them stood back abit square on
 

laeht22

New Member
Post more pictures without light shining down them stood back abit square on
I understand what you're saying but that's not how you live in a house, walls are seen from all angles in differing lights. By standing square on in dull light it does look better as it's flat and white but is that acceptable? The light in the images is natural light from high glazing. Everyone seems to have everything pinned on the non-reflective paint working so fingers crossed.
 

John j

Mono Don
I understand what you're saying but that's not how you live in a house, walls are seen from all angles in differing lights. By standing square on in dull light it does look better as it's flat and white but is that acceptable? The light in the images is natural light from high glazing. Everyone seems to have everything pinned on the non-reflective paint working so fingers crossed.
Should of told him to skim em only when sun's on it for 40 mins a day
 

Stevieo

Royal Spin Doctor
I understand what you're saying but that's not how you live in a house, walls are seen from all angles in differing lights. By standing square on in dull light it does look better as it's flat and white but is that acceptable? The light in the images is natural light from high glazing. Everyone seems to have everything pinned on the non-reflective paint working so fingers crossed.
Somebody will be along in a minute to tell you that work should be judged from the middle of the room in daylight and it's not fair to throw raking light at it.

But if your house has raking light all over it then extra care should have been taken in recognition of that.

So if you haven't paid in full then don't and if you have, then contact your builder.
 

Elite exteriors

Well-Known Member
I understand what you're saying but that's not how you live in a house, walls are seen from all angles in differing lights. By standing square on in dull light it does look better as it's flat and white but is that acceptable? The light in the images is natural light from high glazing. Everyone seems to have everything pinned on the non-reflective paint working so fingers crossed.
You cannot beat glancing light no matter what you do it will always look worse when it's on it
 

spread95

Well-Known Member
It does look better without light on it but is that really a fair and realistic way to judge it? There's always going to be light in a building and on walls at different times of the day. We were not expecting perfection but were also not expecting it to look like this.
Sunlight is in the range of 100000 lumens on a wall and a 100watt led worklight is around 10000 so judging a wall with sunlight at a severe angle is not fair and realistic!
 

spread95

Well-Known Member
I understand what you're saying but that's not how you live in a house, walls are seen from all angles in differing lights. By standing square on in dull light it does look better as it's flat and white but is that acceptable? The light in the images is natural light from high glazing. Everyone seems to have everything pinned on the non-reflective paint working so fingers crossed.
A good architect would of explained to you about light ingress when he showed you his planned glazing scheme
 

Lastlaff

Well-Known Member
What is underneath the plaster - block/brick wall or plasterboard?
Put a straight edge on the wall and then you’ll know how out it is.
 

MakeItSmooth

Well-Known Member
You think that all walls should get a cross trowel?

I was just trying to make a point that, in the uploaded pics, you can see nearly all the trowel strokes from laying on - not that a cross trowel is the solution to every wall, or that a cross trowel would be a complete (or early enough) solution anyway. In other words, it looks (almost) like someone just laid on and then went home, with no further trowel stages. Not saying that happened - just saying it has that kind of appearance, with maybe a bit of troweling afterwards, with wrong timings.


I'm tempted to guess that whoever did it underestimated the amount of suction or the size of the wall, and didn't flatten it as they went, so it had maybe pulled in too much by the time they'd got the whole wall laid on. If that happened, then it's unfortunate and I'm not knocking anyone for having an accidental nightmare - but I don't see how they could expect to get paid without sorting it (even if on their own time, on another day).

Vincey made a valid point that it's easy to criticise someone else's work, and I agree, to a point, but I feel that in this instance it's not a small margin. If you can see almost every single trowel stroke, then surely that's not good enough, and surely whoever did it must've realised?
 
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Ritch

Well-Known Member
I understand what you're saying but that's not how you live in a house, walls are seen from all angles in differing lights. By standing square on in dull light it does look better as it's flat and white but is that acceptable? The light in the images is natural light from high glazing. Everyone seems to have everything pinned on the non-reflective paint working so fingers crossed.
This wall has a south facing masive by fold door in it , sun coming through pretty much allday. Skimmed it with tons of leds and the light naturally coming in. Didn’t need to be spot on cause the kitchen will be covering all of it, but that’s not the point still do your best to make it look flat crisp as possible
 

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Spudknit

Well-Known Member
This wall has a south facing masive by fold door in it , sun coming through pretty much allday. Skimmed it with tons of leds and the light naturally coming in. Didn’t need to be spot on cause the kitchen will be covering all of it, but that’s not the point still do your best to make it look flat crisp as possible
Rough as a badgers arse is that
 

jamesthefirst

Private Member
Same as Ritch i try to put as much lights on as i can shining down wall from both sides.
Been using pure finish lately and cross trowels and dries out a treat like the old days of multi!
 

essexandy

The Lake Governor
This wall has a south facing masive by fold door in it , sun coming through pretty much allday. Skimmed it with tons of leds and the light naturally coming in. Didn’t need to be spot on cause the kitchen will be covering all of it, but that’s not the point still do your best to make it look flat crisp as possible
That is a very different type of light.
 

essexandy

The Lake Governor
I think it's fair to say that sprayed paint wouldn't cause that level of irregularities. We are having to look at a non-reflective alternative paint to see if it can disguise the finish but it's not a miracle worker. Plus you can feel the level of undulations in the plaster.
Oh I think you'd be very surprised. Surely the plaster was visible long before any paint touched it, why was the quality not questioned at that point?
Not having a go at you, just trying to be fair to the plasterer who may not have been at fault.
The state of the bottom of that wall is definitely nothing to do with the spread, which makes me suspicious of the quality of the decorating.
 
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