Georgian house with Damp

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Des D

New Member
Hi, I'm purchasing a Georgian property, which has just been renovated using traditional lime render, but prior to the renovation it was open to the weather and moisture has built up in the walls. Now the developer obviously didn't take time to allow the walls to dry out before rendering, so there is now some damp and discolouration on the internal walls. So, the question is would I need to remove the lime render and allow the walls to dry out naturally or leave the lime render as it is. Also would getting a dehumidifier help or maybe having a particular temperature in the house. I realise it will take a while, maybe 6 months for it to dry out, but wanted to know the best approach. Any advice would be welcome, thanks in advance.
 

kgreigh

Well-Known Member
The lime should let the masonry breath,leave it on unless there are some hidden problems you and the builder havnt spotted.have you any pics?
 

Des D

New Member
Will get some more today, as doing another viewing as wanted to see the progress of the damp and staining, I'll then post them.
 

Des D

New Member
Here are the images, hopefully you can see the discolouration. I guess the work was finished about 6 to 8 weeks ago, so there is no mold just the colour change and this visit there was a slight damp smell.
 

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Jgreenplastering

Private Member
They have probably not let things dry out and have decorated to quick which is now acting as Barrier to the moisture that wants to evaporate.
Being just renovated you can bet there was prob a quick turnaround for ££££!
 
Leave to dry out, put a dehumidifier in and wait...
Check the plaster is actually lime ... ( not cement and lime) and that the paint is breathable?
 
Dehumidifiers are your friend get the heating on and if all goes well should be good :)



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Des D

New Member
In answer to jgreenplastering, no they didn't and that is the problem, so wanted to check if I needed to try get some money off the purchase price if I was going to need to take the plaster off to to allow the wall to dry. The developer has stated its lime plaster, and he even said just got to let it dry out, but thanks for your responses as also wanted to check if putting a dehumidifier in would help or hinder. Hopefully all will go well, and thanks for the advice.
 

Jgreenplastering

Private Member
In answer to jgreenplastering, no they didn't and that is the problem, so wanted to check if I needed to try get some money off the purchase price if I was going to need to take the plaster off to to allow the wall to dry. The developer has stated its lime plaster, and he even said just got to let it dry out, but thanks for your responses as also wanted to check if putting a dehumidifier in would help or hinder. Hopefully all will go well, and thanks for the advice.

Once you get the heating on that will help to dry things out.
If the paints blistering I'd sand it back to the plaster as soon as you can so it can breathe.
Then you might just need to redecorate.
Leave the paint to blister and you'll cause more damage than good and will need to do more than just decorate.
 
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