Dry lining over plastered walls

jrterror

New Member
Hi. Have a shower enclosure that is slightly too wide for the tray. It has been suggested to me that I could affix a moisture resistant plaster board to one of the existing plastered walls to narrow the gap. This makes sense, but how would this be done. Can you use board adhesive on walls already plastered? The existing plaster is many years old. If so, which products would I use and what is best practice?

A more in-depth description of the issue follows.
We are replacing the tiles in the enclosure with wet wall panels. The tiles have now been removed and in doing so has revealed a gap varying in width between 2mm-6mm between the shower tray and the three walls. I know that this gap would ordinarily be filled with silicone sealant. My great concern is that the Mermaid Wet Wall panels that we have purchased are only 3mm thick. The instructions state that a 6mm bead of adhesive is to be used to fasten the panel to the wall, but obviously this adhesive will squash down to 1mm-2mm. There are sections where the panels could end up sitting behind the shower tray instead if on top of it. I know that this is a big no no. It was for this reason that someone suggested, chopping out two of to the three walls, (let's say the rear wall and the left hand wall) this will effectively allow the tray to be set into these two walls, thus closing the gap. However, in doing so, as the tray is moved to left, this increases the gap at the RHS. Installing a moisture resistant plaster board at the RHS would eliminate this gap. Which now leads me to another question...I imagined that I would have to then plaster the new plasterboard newly situated on the right, before I could apply the Mapei Shower proofing kit (paint). I thought that this would really slow down the process, because I would have to wait ages until the plaster had dried sufficiently to apply the tanking. But, i have been told that because I am using wet wall panels, I don't need to even tank the walls, probably because moisture can't get in. I guess
Because there are no porous grout lines. Is this true? Can I fix the wet wall panels directly to non plastered plasterboard? Is it really wise to not even tank the walls, whether they be plastered or simply plain non plaster plasterboard?

Sorry, I know there is so much to take in there. Any help you can offer will be greatly appreciated
 

Attachments

  • IMG_20220929_142129_456.jpg
    IMG_20220929_142129_456.jpg
    2.6 MB · Views: 43

Dollar

Well-Known Member
The 3mm shower panels are budget ..Are really meant for over existing tiles... (creates a refresh of sorts) .

(Never bodge in wet areas )
Right tray /enclosure /shower door /panel/tiles
Sealants years & years trouble free showering ....
 

Stewie03

Well-Known Member
If the wall in question is shot and hollow then no you can’t apply aboard on top of the existing plaster,well you can just pray to the lord Jesus there’s no problems after
 

jrterror

New Member
Hi. No there is absolutely nothing wrong with the walls, my concern is as previously stated, there is a gap between the wall and the shower tray. Not sure what you mean by hollow?
I can't return wet wall panels, so I just want some advice on best practice, but to over come the issues.
So, I'll state it differently in a series of questions.

1. What is required to affix a moisture resistant plaster board to a very good condition plastered wall?

2. Is it necessary to tank the walls prior to installing the wet wall panels? It has been suggested that because there are no grout lines that water can not penetrate, therefore tanking is not required.

3. If tanking is required, should I tank the non plastered wall using something like the Mapei Shower proofing kit, or should it be plastered prior to tanking?

Hopefully someone can help me find out the answers and offer some detailed advice

Many thanks
 

Retired Spread

Well-Known Member
Hi. Have a shower enclosure that is slightly too wide for the tray. It has been suggested to me that I could affix a moisture resistant plaster board to one of the existing plastered walls to narrow the gap. This makes sense, but how would this be done. Can you use board adhesive on walls already plastered? The existing plaster is many years old. If so, which products would I use and what is best practice?

A more in-depth description of the issue follows.
We are replacing the tiles in the enclosure with wet wall panels. The tiles have now been removed and in doing so has revealed a gap varying in width between 2mm-6mm between the shower tray and the three walls. I know that this gap would ordinarily be filled with silicone sealant. My great concern is that the Mermaid Wet Wall panels that we have purchased are only 3mm thick. The instructions state that a 6mm bead of adhesive is to be used to fasten the panel to the wall, but obviously this adhesive will squash down to 1mm-2mm. There are sections where the panels could end up sitting behind the shower tray instead if on top of it. I know that this is a big no no. It was for this reason that someone suggested, chopping out two of to the three walls, (let's say the rear wall and the left hand wall) this will effectively allow the tray to be set into these two walls, thus closing the gap. However, in doing so, as the tray is moved to left, this increases the gap at the RHS. Installing a moisture resistant plaster board at the RHS would eliminate this gap. Which now leads me to another question...I imagined that I would have to then plaster the new plasterboard newly situated on the right, before I could apply the Mapei Shower proofing kit (paint). I thought that this would really slow down the process, because I would have to wait ages until the plaster had dried sufficiently to apply the tanking. But, i have been told that because I am using wet wall panels, I don't need to even tank the walls, probably because moisture can't get in. I guess
Because there are no porous grout lines. Is this true? Can I fix the wet wall panels directly to non plastered plasterboard? Is it really wise to not even tank the walls, whether they be plastered or simply plain non plaster plasterboard?

Sorry, I know there is so much to take in there. Any help you can offer will be greatly appreciated
f**k that.gif
 

essexandy

The Lake Governor
Hi. No there is absolutely nothing wrong with the walls, my concern is as previously stated, there is a gap between the wall and the shower tray. Not sure what you mean by hollow?
I can't return wet wall panels, so I just want some advice on best practice, but to over come the issues.
So, I'll state it differently in a series of questions.

1. What is required to affix a moisture resistant plaster board to a very good condition plastered wall?

2. Is it necessary to tank the walls prior to installing the wet wall panels? It has been suggested that because there are no grout lines that water can not penetrate, therefore tanking is not required.

3. If tanking is required, should I tank the non plastered wall using something like the Mapei Shower proofing kit, or should it be plastered prior to tanking?

Hopefully someone can help me find out the answers and offer some detailed advice

Many thanks
Use 12.5mm board and stick to the plastered wall with something like Stickslikeshit turbo. This is almost the same as the laminate system.
 

themucky1

Well-Known Member
Hi. No there is absolutely nothing wrong with the walls, my concern is as previously stated, there is a gap between the wall and the shower tray. Not sure what you mean by hollow?
I can't return wet wall panels, so I just want some advice on best practice, but to over come the issues.
So, I'll state it differently in a series of questions.

1. What is required to affix a moisture resistant plaster board to a very good condition plastered wall?

2. Is it necessary to tank the walls prior to installing the wet wall panels? It has been suggested that because there are no grout lines that water can not penetrate, therefore tanking is not required.

3. If tanking is required, should I tank the non plastered wall using something like the Mapei Shower proofing kit, or should it be plastered prior to tanking?

Hopefully @themucky1 can help me find out the answers and offer some detailed advice

Many thanks
I’ll state my answers to the relevant questions.

1. A moisture resistant plasterboard is required.

2. Yes

3. Yes

No problem I just have. And I’d definitely say you’re an engineer.
Good day to you sir.
 

Stevieo

Royal Spin Doctor
I’ll state my answers to the relevant questions.

1. A moisture resistant plasterboard is required.

2. Yes

3. Yes

No problem I just have. And I’d definitely say you’re an engineer.
Good day to you sir.
Never work for an engineer on price. I worked for one on day rate once and thank fick I did. Spent all day wiffling on about the job and not letting me get on with it.

And he had his wife out holding the staff on Sunday while he checked my patio with his laser
 
Top