Dry lining or re -plastering damp solid walls in 1930s house?

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baz63

New Member
Hello

I'm buying a house built in 1930. I'm told it has solid walls. There is much damp caused by defective chimneys and the damp course being bridged by the outside render touching the ground. Guttering, chimneys and the outside render will be repaired.

I have received conflicting advice as to which option to pursue:

1. Hack away all defective/damp plaster and re plaster with a breathable plaster
2. dry line the outer walls internally with insulation boards and mechanically fix to ensure there's a cavity.

Assuming condensation in the house is sorted and no more moisture enters the house because repairs are successful I'm inclined to dry line the external walls. My priority is insulation.

Any problems with dry lining solid external walls internally when they have been damp? Will dry lining lead to more damp because the walls cannot breathe?

What would you do?

THanks
 

johniosaif

Private Member
1930s house are a bitch to dry out, solve the problems outside (causes of damp) inside if there room,use an mf stud wall, INsulate and board .
 

baz63

New Member
...and use a breathable plaster like lime lite is one advice because being solid walls they need to breathe. But wouldn't dry lining the external walls internally with a cavity not only allow the walls to dry out but will also provide insulation? Because it's the a
Legend insulation qualities of dry lining which is attracting me more towards that option but i' m concerned it might be totally the wrong option for solid dampish walls.
Thanks for the replies btw
 

baz63

New Member
This is what I favour at the moment not least because I got this idea in my head that it will insulate the house and prevent condensation. Need to do more research - got to get it right
 

taylor

Member
I live in the same type of house and I've got bad condensation and mould on all the external walls.I'm gonna hack off the damp walls and dot and dab 22mm insulation boards to the walls I'm only hacking them off coz I've got to match in to the original covering in the 22mm boards give me just enough room.I've seen the same problem on pretty much every 30's house I've worked in.
 

roryston

Well-Known Member
Hack the damp walls off, waterproof sand cement render and skim

ventilation is key to condensation.

1930s houses lack ventilation, you want airbricks on the ground floor venting underneath the floors, and air vents in the corner of each upstairs room venting to a external wall.
 

adapt

Active Member
Insulated boards are the way to go on external walls.

Hack off re-render then dot and dab on insulated boards, you need to up the insulation on the coldest walls these are the external walls.
Make sure you have fixed the outside first and have used a good masonry paint if they are painted
 

theshed

Well-Known Member
Insulated boards are the way to go on external walls.

Hack off re-render then dot and dab on insulated boards, you need to up the insulation on the coldest walls these are the external walls.
Make sure you have fixed the outside first and have used a good masonry paint if they are painted

Did the whole downstairs of my own house with 40mm thermal board. House is now free from damp and easy to heat. I ran 8in brickies dpc behind board joints and internals.
 

D4mp

New Member
Hello

Insulated boards are a good thing if you have resolved the dampness problem. I prefer to use battens as this is a better method than dot and dab.
Most importantly you need to ensure good ventilation by means of extraction fans, otherwise you will run the risk of interstitial condensation.
 

FreeD

Private Member
Hi,

I've done loads of these jobs on 1930's properties...hack off render...treated roofing battens at 400 centres with dpc stapled to the back, fix battens to walls...get the battens flat using string lines, then fix 27mm thermaline plus insulated plasterboard to battens, they have a vapour barrier, quality boards. We have fixed them to damp solid walls which are still drying out, no problems. Makes the room nice and cosy!
 

adapt

Active Member
D4mp is right its best to batten off but on dry internal walls we tend to dab as its faster.

The more you can raise the u values of a room the better, external walls are the coldest walls of a property, lost count of the condensation issues from north facing walls I have been to look at.
If I had a £100 for every call I would have a new van by now :RpS_lol:
 
you must always use sand and cement on walls,either float the walls up plum or scratch coat the walls then dot and dab over insuring you have the water barrier.
 

Chris Barrow

New Member
Hello

I'm buying a house built in 1930. I'm told it has solid walls. There is much damp caused by defective chimneys and the damp course being bridged by the outside render touching the ground. Guttering, chimneys and the outside render will be repaired.

I have received conflicting advice as to which option to pursue:

1. Hack away all defective/damp plaster and re plaster with a breathable plaster
2. dry line the outer walls internally with insulation boards and mechanically fix to ensure there's a cavity.

Assuming condensation in the house is sorted and no more moisture enters the house because repairs are successful I'm inclined to dry line the external walls. My priority is insulation.

Any problems with dry lining solid external walls internally when they have been damp? Will dry lining lead to more damp because the walls cannot breathe?

What would you do?

THanks
Hi we have a new product that would sort the issue of the cold out.But you do need the fix the initial damp problem first.
 

theshed

Well-Known Member
Did the whole downstairs of my own house with 40mm thermal board. House is now free from damp and easy to heat. I ran 8in brickies dpc behind board joints and internals.
I did exactly the same in my own house, not a sign of damp and easy to heat. That was 15 years ago.
 
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