Domestic dilemma

Ralphyboy

Member
This is shortened version of events of my dilemma.
Not been doing domestics for long so any advice would be appreciated.
Customer's bedroom had 1 outside wall that been left floated & then painted by previous owners.
He had a "handyman" from FB skim this wall,he let it dry,mist coated it with added pva in the mix & then several areas of plaster blew!
I quoted to remove all blown areas,pva& skim.
Did this,which left a small area of handyman's skim so pva'd all wall twice,skimmed when tacky and then on one trowelling up noticed it bubbling up in small areas which then became what's in photos.
Completely confused as to why this happened as this area of wall didn't react adversely to the pva before skimming.
I said I will get back to customer with possible solution he said he'll just hack all back to floated wall & paint that if there isn't an answer.
Anybody had this happen before & what's the solution?
 

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madmonk

Private Member
If the floated wall had been painted or not keyed up should have been blue grit its just shelled off not only that i would have give it a tight coat of bonding first
 

madmonk

Private Member
There is no key on that blue s**t whatever it is take it paint skim looks massively thick aswell hence should have a tight coat of bonding
 

Ralphyboy

Member
Thanks guys.
So what would be the best solution to suggest to customer as he's all for hacking back to floated wall & just painting instead?
 

smoother09

Well-Known Member
Would be best getting back to were floated maybe scratch some extra keys in use some large nails or something then pre grit and do it next day! Or just walk away if he’s been a dick (y)
 

Stewie03

Active Member
I agree with bof things like that I always give 2 tight coats of bonding it also reduces crazing if your just going to pva and skim over a fry floated wall
 

The Hobo

Well-Known Member
This is shortened version of events of my dilemma.
Not been doing domestics for long so any advice would be appreciated.
Customer's bedroom had 1 outside wall that been left floated & then painted by previous owners.
He had a "handyman" from FB skim this wall,he let it dry,mist coated it with added pva in the mix & then several areas of plaster blew!
I quoted to remove all blown areas,pva& skim.
Did this,which left a small area of handyman's skim so pva'd all wall twice,skimmed when tacky and then on one trowelling up noticed it bubbling up in small areas which then became what's in photos.
Completely confused as to why this happened as this area of wall didn't react adversely to the pva before skimming.
I said I will get back to customer with possible solution he said he'll just hack all back to floated wall & paint that if there isn't an answer.
Anybody had this happen before & what's the solution?
when you re do it please run a brush down the angle
 

Wayners

Well-Known Member
Old emulsion has degraded over time and your wet plaster was the last straw and gave up the grip. Lucky you! I got caught last year and that was first time in ages. I would get top layer of skim and paint coats off. If that blue paint is powdery then dustless sand (bodge orbital sander on vac with 80 grit) beeline sealer then pva or bluegrit... skim. Sorted. Old emulsions didn't contain binder like vinyl so more likely to degrade you see
 

malc

TPF Special Forces
Old emulsion has degraded over time and your wet plaster was the last straw and gave up the grip. Lucky you! I got caught last year and that was first time in ages. I would get top layer of skim and paint coats off. If that blue paint is powdery then dustless sand (bodge orbital sander on vac with 80 grit) beeline sealer then pva or bluegrit... skim. Sorted. Old emulsions didn't contain binder like vinyl so more likely to degrade you see
are you talking about emulsion or distemper ?
 

Wayners

Well-Known Member
Distemper I call white wash. Was powder mixed with water. Then the first emulsions were similar and chalky, but came in a range of colours but had binders so good for walls as would not come off if you brushed against them, but these degrade over time. Next was vinyl emulsions. These early emulsions are a problem sometimes
 
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