Curved ceiling

#1
Hi all bit of advice needed plastering ceiling under eaves so has a curve its hampering laying on any advice or tips to overcome this I'm quite new to it
 

Simon85

Well-Known Member
#4
Bond your rounds and let it set before u skim it. Ideally squeeze a Drop into it and then run another skin of bonding in it to form ur round. If ur not confident in ur skill of forming the round uniform give it a wee straighten with and edge, or speedskim after bonding. Then just skim it. They aren't that difficult really.
 

Simon85

Well-Known Member
#7
They will do that, but once u get. The hang of them they are easy enough.
Get into the habit of keeping your trowel as flat as Possible for your first few passes, if u have too much cut on the blade ul take too much off, especially highlighted when u go to do rounds, ul be back to base coat.
 

Simon85

Well-Known Member
#9
View attachment 22504 As Simon said bond it out and skim it.
Nice work.
They aren't as difficult as they look, actually often are easier than making the angles sharp, as usually the hip ceiling angle is a c**t to do straight so rounding it makes it easier. Worked in a squad before and I mind giving off, one lad (with about 40 years experience had left rounds a mess, full of holes, his mate in squad said rounds always have holes and dips in them, I was like, no, they aren't supposed to if they are done right ffs. But again those two men in question are two of the three roughest plasterers I've ever seen lol
 

Nicm

Well-Known Member
#10
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Nice work.
They aren't as difficult as they look, actually often are easier than making the angles sharp, as usually the hip ceiling angle is a c**t to do straight so rounding it makes it easier. Worked in a squad before and I mind giving off, one lad (with about 40 years experience had left rounds a mess, full of holes, his mate in squad said rounds always have holes and dips in them, I was like, no, they aren't supposed to if they are done right ffs. But again those two men in question are two of the three roughest plasterers I've ever seen lol
If they want the angles straight i’d do the top and vertical sides first and then pull a chalk line on them and do the slopes then which is the hardest because i’m working to a line then.
 
#11
Thanks for the advice btw my name is Lee from Portsmouth renovating my house so I've got plenty of practice to get it right Mrs is happy with what I've done so far so I'm happy too lol
 

malc

Private Member
#16
Any advice on a van I don't really want anything too big as parking is an issue but obviously needs to be big enough to fit plasterboard in it
we have got a Mazda pickup truck 4x2. i cut 3 scaffold boards to just overhang the width and we can place over 20 sheets on top of the butt. easy to load and unload and the sheets are kept flat.
 

t33ch

Active Member
#18
They would be no bigger than 2400x1250 sheets
SWB Ducato/Boxer/Relay.
I've got Ducato, Fiat engine seems to have a bit more tourqe.
Space inside is great and fits standard boards in with ease.
For the ocasional time I need 2.7's or 3.0's I'll have them poking out the back or get delivered.
If needed 2.7's will fit diagonal depending on racking.

Can't be arsed trying to find parking for LWB vans.