Courser, time served or chancer

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windy

Private Member
I love these terms : Chancer, courser and time served
But logically you need to accept that at some point a

Chancer can become time served if he spends long enough on an experienced team learning the ropes

Same for a courser

When does one become the other?

On a seperate note i just plastered a relatives room (im a courser 4 yrs in)

He wanted skirting/architraves fitting `so we contacted a "time served chippie" been in the game since 16 (now 37) no bullshit in places i could get my finger behind the skirting and the coping work was atrocious.

Paid the prick £40 for the whole day and asked him to take us to trading standards if he had a problem.

Caulking gun here we come :RpS_mad:
 

windy

Private Member
yeah the bill from outset wasnt £40. I agreed 80/90 quid for a 2/3rds day finish at 3pm

He got 40 quid when i saw the finish
 
lol yep I know what your saying windy

I rather be a courser than a chancer and in time you will become time served.... as long as your not a chancer...lol

in the end a good job is a good job
 

beddy

Well-Known Member
finish at 3pm, thats a full days wage. but if the jobs crap then thats a different story
 

Freerider

Member
I see what your saying and your right if his work was s**t, but I think you were taking the piss giving him £80/90 for a FULL day, 3pm is basically a full day, and since when do we do 1/3 of days? ;)

Anyway, like above, chancers, coursers, dont matter how ya do it providing you do a good job, I suppose I was a bit of a chancer when I started, not cos I wanted to be but was cos I was naive and went out on my own with very little experience, learnt the hard way and made a lot of mistakes! but happy to say 7years down the line now and cracked it!
 

bubbles65

Well-Known Member
:rolleyes) I'm reading this differently here - if you could get your fingers behind the skirting, maybe the new plaster was a mile out :-0
 

gitznshiggles

New Member
speaking as a non practising but never the less a "time served chippy", i have a question....

how fking big was this room that it would require a chip to spend an entire day to cut n fix architraves and skirting.. time served my ass... what was it the albert hall??
 

windy

Private Member
I think £80/90 in the current climate to fit skirts to a av living room is more than enough. A competant chippie cud have been out the door at 11.30 .

The room had skirts before and all i did was overskim with 3mm of finish so i dont think it cud have been my work in all honesty knocking the walls out
 

gitznshiggles

New Member
1 room is barely an hours work to be honest unless lots of mitres and scribes.
when you took the old skirtings off to reskim, did the walls look shot or did you offer up a feather edge...? only other reason to explain getting a finger down the back is that the skirting was twisted/bowed, but even so he should have been able to fix it back tight... or did he gripfill em on
 

ollie

New Member
:rolleyes) I'm reading this differently here - if you could get your fingers behind the skirting, maybe the new plaster was a mile out :-0

i think your on to something there, when i was at college even the apprentise chippies were able to put a peice of twisted skirting on straight. id put a straight edge down the wall to make sure
 

Freerider

Member
I think £80/90 in the current climate to fit skirts to a av living room is more than enough. A competant chippie cud have been out the door at 11.30 .

The room had skirts before and all i did was overskim with 3mm of finish so i dont think it cud have been my work in all honesty knocking the walls out

thats fair enough, hes just slow!

No matter how far the room is out OR the skirts are twisted, when plugged and screwed they would pull back anyway, I often gripfill skirts but this is only when the alls are straight!

You should have took a picture matey, am intrigued to see how bad a job he did! :D
 

The Apprentice

Well-Known Member
Chancer = Somebody who thinks I'll have a go at that.
Courser = Somebody who attends a short course, is shown what to do and has a go at doing it somewhere that it doesn't matter.
Time served = Somebody who spends in the region of 2 years learning the ropes, practicing somewhere it doesn't matter and understands why certain things have to be done and should know what to do.

So when does 1 become the other?
 

windy

Private Member
Obvious

When the courser spends time with an experienced team and learns the ropes over a number of years under supervision

ie therebye serving a sort of apprentiship
 

gitznshiggles

New Member
im sure when i did my chippy apprenticeship there were other apprentices for all the other trades apart from spreads... is that the norm?
 
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