Concerned about damp proofing job just completed

Keithlp

New Member
We have just had an some walls in our basement damp-proofed and re-plastered by a specialist company. It is now 3 weeks since the work was completed and it has dried well (naturally, without dehumidifiers etc).

Our builder, who did the strip out pre damp works, returned yesterday to look at reinstating the room, and he condemned the work straight away as there are significant areas of new plaster showing efflorescence. He says categorically this should not be happening. I am in the process of talking to the specialist contractor but I would value some opinions as to whether some efflorescence during the drying process is to be expected or not.

many thanks in advance.
 

Keithlp

New Member
From their spec sheet:
Apply SIKA 1 multi-coat render approximately 18mm thick to walls as indicated on the plan. This will follow the general contours of the substrate and will be finished with a 3mm renovating finishing plaster.
 

Keithlp

New Member
Yes I do. But the specialist installers tell me efflorescence is normal during the drying out process and if they come and inspect it and that's all it is, they will charge me. My builder thinks it isn't normal... I'm trying to get an independent view. I don't want to reinstate the room and then find we do in fact have a problem, even if it is covered by guarantee it would be a nightmare to reinstate the room only to have to strip it again.
 

gps

Well-Known Member
We have just had an some walls in our basement damp-proofed and re-plastered by a specialist company. It is now 3 weeks since the work was completed and it has dried well (naturally, without dehumidifiers etc).

Our builder, who did the strip out pre damp works, returned yesterday to look at reinstating the room, and he condemned the work straight away as there are significant areas of new plaster showing efflorescence. He says categorically this should not be happening. I am in the process of talking to the specialist contractor but I would value some opinions as to whether some efflorescence during the drying process is to be expected or not.

many thanks in advance.



Yes it can and does happen, now if your builder is such an expert why didn’t he do it ?
 

Dacha

Member
We have just had an some walls in our basement damp-proofed and re-plastered by a specialist company. It is now 3 weeks since the work was completed and it has dried well (naturally, without dehumidifiers etc).

Our builder, who did the strip out pre damp works, returned yesterday to look at reinstating the room, and he condemned the work straight away as there are significant areas of new plaster showing efflorescence. He says categorically this should not be happening. I am in the process of talking to the specialist contractor but I would value some opinions as to whether some efflorescence during the drying process is to be expected or not.

many thanks in advance.
Was damp proofing left to dry out completely before replastering ?
 

Keithlp

New Member
Yes, I agree my builder is not the expert, but I am even less so, that's why I came here to see what all you peeps with the knowledge would say.
Thanks to everyone, on balance it seems like it can be part of the process so I will trust the specialist and get on with putting things back (slowly of course while it dries...)
 

Lodan

Well-Known Member
Yes, I agree my builder is not the expert, but I am even less so, that's why I came here to see what all you peeps with the knowledge would say.
Thanks to everyone, on balance it seems like it can be part of the process so I will trust the specialist and get on with putting things back (slowly of course while it dries...)
Tell your builder to not condemn work he isn't an expert in
 

Tinytom

Well-Known Member
In my experience efflorescence comes after the damp is cured, it’s usually a good sign it’s drying out
 

Keithlp

New Member
Tell your builder to not condemn work he isn't an expert in
To be fair, he is a builder I have used a few times and he is a good guy, he was worried on my behalf. I've updated him on the comments here. So hopefully he will know in future (unless of course he is proven right lol).
 

Lodan

Well-Known Member
To be fair, he is a builder I have used a few times and he is a good guy, he was worried on my behalf. I've updated him on the comments here. So hopefully he will know in future (unless of course he is proven right lol).
Yes he is a builder not a damp specialist
 

Dropsalot

Private Member
There are many here who profess knowledge,of the damp patch......but I might argue that @Marshy would be a country mile ahead of us all...........that is not of course to dismiss @JessThePlasterer , who also has a wealth of experience in this area......
 

JessThePlasterer

Queen Jess Elizabeth I
Damp patches should be approached with caution. Make sure you know what you’re doing or you’ll be wasting everyone’s time. There are a few methods for how to treat damp patches but whatever you go with make sure you take your time and carry out the job thoroughly . Remember prep is 90% of the job! Hope that helps any novices and refreshes any old hands!
 

lurpak

Artex Boy
Damp patches should be approached with caution. Make sure you know what you’re doing or you’ll be wasting everyone’s time. There are a few methods for how to treat damp patches but whatever you go with make sure you take your time and carry out the job thoroughly . Remember prep is 90% of the job! Hope that helps any novices and refreshes any old hands!
Literally just came reading that.

 

Dropsalot

Private Member
Damp patches should be approached with caution. Make sure you know what you’re doing or you’ll be wasting everyone’s time. There are a few methods for how to treat damp patches but whatever you go with make sure you take your time and carry out the job thoroughly . Remember prep is 90% of the job! Hope that helps any novices and refreshes any old hands!
That reminds me........chapped hands..........there’s only one kind of damp patch that cures it.......
 
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