Chimney breast not drying

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Shana k

New Member
Hi
We took out our chimney breast 2 weeks ago and re plastered the whole room along with it. 2 weeks on, the 3 walls are dry as pie but the chimney wall is around 95% dry all around, but the 5% in the middle is still wet (ish). There seems to be quite a few blob shapes that are dark and look wet. Does anyone know what this could be, if its summit serious, and how long u think it'll take to dry. Ive primed the other walls but cnt do anything further as im waiting on this wall to dry. Please help x
 

The Hobo

Well-Known Member
Hi
We took out our chimney breast 2 weeks ago and re plastered the whole room along with it. 2 weeks on, the 3 walls are dry as pie but the chimney wall is around 95% dry all around, but the 5% in the middle is still wet (ish). There seems to be quite a few blob shapes that are dark and look wet. Does anyone know what this could be, if its summit serious, and how long u think it'll take to dry. Ive primed the other walls but cnt do anything further as im waiting on this wall to dry. Please help x
if damp is about head level then its on the bend of the flue so water getting in some were around chimney head area best of luck
 

hammerandnail

New Member
Hi, did you find a solution? I have a similar problem. Bought a old house built in 1954, and had been vacant for two years. Plaster over the unused chimney had fallen/rotted off. Looked like old water damage but the roof was new and I didn't see any leaking water. Plastered over it (regular plaster), and in about a week the plaster discolored and then bubbled off. I've had roofers come in twice, take off the solar panels to check underneath, check the flashing, pour buckets of water on it and nothing. Checked the attic too and no sign of water. After the first check I redid it with gyprock 20. Same thing happened. Could it be condensation? The rest of the chimney area is fine and looks like it's covered with a cement stucco. I'm wondering if warm air in the house is condensing behind the plaster, on the raw brick. Then that moisture is seeping through the plaster.
 

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brimplas1

Well-Known Member
Hi, did you find a solution? I have a similar problem. Bought a old house built in 1954, and had been vacant for two years. Plaster over the unused chimney had fallen/rotted off. Looked like old water damage but the roof was new and I didn't see any leaking water. Plastered over it (regular plaster), and in about a week the plaster discolored and then bubbled off. I've had roofers come in twice, take off the solar panels to check underneath, check the flashing, pour buckets of water on it and nothing. Checked the attic too and no sign of water. After the first check I redid it with gyprock 20. Same thing happened. Could it be condensation? The rest of the chimney area is fine and looks like it's covered with a cement stucco. I'm wondering if warm air in the house is condensing behind the plaster, on the raw brick. Then that moisture is seeping through the plaster.
What exactly is standard plaster???? If a gypsum based plaster has been used you could have salt/mineral problems.... I would have sprayed the area with a salt inhibitor and rendered with renovating plaster....
 

Brimstone

Active Member
Both cases; Sounds like you've removed the chimney upstairs aswell? In 1st case as per Hobo, could be flashing failure.
Possibles; Lime mortar affected by previous soot/sulphuric attack and is shot and/or attracting water from outside - failed or non existent external render, - porous bricks,,
in all cases plaster moisture and salts/soot bleed thru per Brimplas, Carl and Fatarm.
Warm air should not be getting past wall finish to condense on brick work
 

Tim Devon

New Member
I'll just throw this product in there as a possible option. Probably best to use it first rather than as a remedy. Any comments of the product welcome, my kitchen has terrible soot/salt staining so am hoping it works as described.

A plaster against the damp patches, discoloration or the crystallization of salts (sulphates) around old fireplaces and chimney stacks, a frequent problem in old buildings

Rinzaffo MGN

Mind you, the website that says this has taken a bit of a slating.

Rinzaffo MGN website in Italian.

Tim Devon
 
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