Breathable/lime plaster products?

imago

Private Member
#1
My question is simply what's available and what's recommended by those who've used them?

The application will be direct to brick infill panels between oak beams. The bricks went in about 1780 or 1790 when the wattle and daub were removed. So they're very porous, dry, and suck like a crack whore two days after her last fix.

We can use modern alternatives to lime, which will also include stuff with some insulating properties. If the finish is white and can be left unpainted that'd be OK.

@Nisus will be applying it so direct any talk of trowelling up etc at him. My involvement will be buying it (and no doubt carrying it into the cottage!) so my concerns will be breathability, availability and price. (y)
 

Nisus

Elite Member
#2
:eek: Why didn't you just ask me today, I'm not a courser fam:endesacuerdo:
I'm a wealth of knowledge with these products, just haven't used them for like 150 years or so :sisi:

Anyway what we need is pva, bonding and sponge finished multi, will look ok from my house :coffe:
 

imago

Private Member
#3
:eek: Why didn't you just ask me today, I'm not a courser fam:endesacuerdo:
I'm a wealth of knowledge with these products, just haven't used them for like 150 years or so :sisi:

Anyway what we need is pva, bonding and sponge finished multi, will look ok from my house :coffe:
:rolleyes: How many times do I have to tell you? You're a HERITAGE plasterer now. We need bags of 'stuff' and it needs to be the sort of thing you can't find in B&Q so that we can charge more.

It won't be sponge finished FFS! It will be cottage effect (thanks @Olican (y)) and will be applied using a traditional soft face open pored applicator referred to in the trade as a spongiam incubuisse.
 

Nisus

Elite Member
#4
:rolleyes: How many times do I have to tell you? You're a HERITAGE plasterer now. We need bags of 'stuff' and it needs to be the sort of thing you can't find in B&Q so that we can charge more.

It won't be sponge finished FFS! It will be cottage effect (thanks @Olican (y)) and will be applied using a traditional soft face open pored applicator referred to in the trade as a spongiam incubuisse.
Oh yeah forgot about the heritage bit :cool:
I've got bags of stuff here mate :rebotando:,,
oh I see what you mean soz it is a Friday night after all o_O

Yeah charge more for the b&q crap and this time next year we'll be minted :envidioso
Well you will be :descansando:
:cry:


spongiam incubuiss :wtf:
Is that a Harry Potter trowel or summat mate? :raro2:
 

Mouldyoldspudgun

Well-Known Member
#5
My question is simply what's available and what's recommended by those who've used them?

The application will be direct to brick infill panels between oak beams. The bricks went in about 1780 or 1790 when the wattle and daub were removed. So they're very porous, dry, and suck like a crack whore two days after her last fix.

We can use modern alternatives to lime, which will also include stuff with some insulating properties. If the finish is white and can be left unpainted that'd be OK.

@Nisus will be applying it so direct any talk of trowelling up etc at him. My involvement will be buying it (and no doubt carrying it into the cottage!) so my concerns will be breathability, availability and price. (y)
Lime putty and sharp sand
 

Vincey

Private Member
#10
I’d say try that l*m*-g***n, the duro is basecoat and solo was lovely to use

Or bauwer light tbf I only used a tester bag but when you really look at the u value achieved with it its a bob on product, conservation love it too
Only problem for me with it is to put through Ritmo I need a special paddle or something and tbh it is a bit of a shitter to get hold of the part
Breathable product too though
There is one more bagged one I seen looked good but can’t remember what it was called
 

carys

Active Member
#22
My question is simply what's available and what's recommended by those who've used them?

The application will be direct to brick infill panels between oak beams. The bricks went in about 1780 or 1790 when the wattle and daub were removed. So they're very porous, dry, and suck like a crack whore two days after her last fix.

We can use modern alternatives to lime, which will also include stuff with some insulating properties. If the finish is white and can be left unpainted that'd be OK.

@Nisus will be applying it so direct any talk of trowelling up etc at him. My involvement will be buying it (and no doubt carrying it into the cottage!) so my concerns will be breathability, availability and price. (y)
Harle wall whith hydrolic lime and p gravel eco Cork plaster and finish lime plaster like skim
 

carys

Active Member
#23
Harle wall whith hydrolic lime and p gravel eco Cork plaster and finish lime plaster like skim
Nice stuff to work whith it like carlite bonding in texture two coat of it and they say it insulate the walls
 

Vincey

Private Member
#24
Maybe @Danny banned them for bullying? Seems to be a lot of that on here lately. :eek:
Either way definitely check those two out mate I used that solo this week i was impressed, posted about it yesterday on here somewhere
Insulation it was Wolsey wood fibre but overall cost wise I have gut feeling client at job should of gone the Bauwer route instead would of worked out cheaper on the installation with slightly better u value but as said they both good imo it’s personal choice
Client originally had decided to go Bauwer route but then changed his mind thinking he’d save on labour cost but f**k*d up
 

carys

Active Member
#25
My question is simply what's available and what's recommended by those who've used them?

The application will be direct to brick infill panels between oak beams. The bricks went in about 1780 or 1790 when the wattle and daub were removed. So they're very porous, dry, and suck like a crack whore two days after her last fix.

We can use modern alternatives to lime, which will also include stuff with some insulating properties. If the finish is white and can be left unpainted that'd be OK.

@Nisus will be applying it so direct any talk of trowelling up etc at him. My involvement will be buying it (and no doubt carrying it into the cottage!) so my concerns will be breathability, availability and price. (y)
If you whant to do it on the cheap horse s**t and lime wash lol
 

imago

Private Member
#28
Ok done that, but still don't get IT? :oops::wtf:
It's Latin for a sponge.

Baddie Builder's guide to charging more than everyone else for the same thing.
1) Use the word 'heritage' as much as possible.
2) Use obscure trade names for things.
3) If there isn't an obscure trade name for something, make one up and preferably in Latin.
4) Don't pass on more than three tips from the Baddie Builder's guide.
5) Don't pass on more than three tips from the Baddie Builder's guide.

(y)
 

Mouldyoldspudgun

Well-Known Member
#30
Who's Melty mate? not been on for a while
His name is something like malt77 and he keeps posting about being bullied on here, he has even blocked lurpak, he should think himself lucky @Pagey or @taylorhendersonplastering don’t come on here at the moment. He has been teaching for a while in Eastern Europe but wants to get back into plastering over here, I guess teaching has made him extremely sensitive but he doesn’t seem a bad bloke
 

essexandy

Private Member
#33
:rolleyes: How many times do I have to tell you? You're a HERITAGE plasterer now. We need bags of 'stuff' and it needs to be the sort of thing you can't find in B&Q so that we can charge more.

It won't be sponge finished FFS! It will be cottage effect (thanks @Olican (y)) and will be applied using a traditional soft face open pored applicator referred to in the trade as a spongiam incubuisse.
So many words of truth spoken in jest.