Bostick plastering stabilising primer ( grit)

The Apprentice

Well-Known Member
Grit or should I say Bond-it, bit of brand loyalty here, is designed for glossy surfaces, from silk paints to tiles. So provided that area is clean it should adhere to it but it must be clean and dust free. If it fails on the substrate you can at times see dust etc on the back of it.
Failures with plaster are predominately due to not mixing it up enough so not enough aggregate in it for the plaster to grip to. Of course it can be applied to thinly which again is a lack of a mechanical key, so not a good idea to dilute it with anything.
If you’re going over it with Bonding coat the depth should not exceed 8mm.
Failure to use any product as per the manufacturer instructions and it’s all on you. Yes it might cost you a bit more time and money but you need to cheat on a lot of jobs to cover 1 fail. Even the PVA manufactures can check the strength of the PVA you used, is it worth the risk? That’s for eac of you to make that call.
 

superspread

Well-Known Member
Grit or should I say Bond-it, bit of brand loyalty here, is designed for glossy surfaces, from silk paints to tiles. So provided that area is clean it should adhere to it but it must be clean and dust free. If it fails on the substrate you can at times see dust etc on the back of it.
Failures with plaster are predominately due to not mixing it up enough so not enough aggregate in it for the plaster to grip to. Of course it can be applied to thinly which again is a lack of a mechanical key, so not a good idea to dilute it with anything.
If you’re going over it with Bonding coat the depth should not exceed 8mm.
Failure to use any product as per the manufacturer instructions and it’s all on you. Yes it might cost you a bit more time and money but you need to cheat on a lot of jobs to cover 1 fail. Even the PVA manufactures can check the strength of the PVA you used, is it worth the risk? That’s for eac of you to make that call.
I don’t dilute anything and don’t cut corners but the manufacturer will always find something they can blame the tradesmen for
 

ChrispyUK

Well-Known Member
It can be a bit harsh internally as it’s a strong smell but nothing else comes close. It’s designed for render so can definitely hold skim.

I’ve heard about the smell during my bit of research about it but apparently once it’s dried it’s ok. Dunno tbf as I’ve never used it.

I’ve potentially got a job coming up over skimming a number of rooms in an ex council house after my mates done the rewire but house is empty. Should be a good test bed for it.
 

tapit

Well-Known Member
I’ve heard about the smell during my bit of research about it but apparently once it’s dried it’s ok. Dunno tbf as I’ve never used it.

I’ve potentially got a job coming up over skimming a number of rooms in an ex council house after my mates done the rewire but house is empty. Should be a good test bed for it.
You can carry out an easy test for grit suitability using my tape. Stick a strip to the wall and leave for a few mins. If it has not stuck to wall then prep wall. If it has stuck well pull away sharply and check paint is still adhered to wall. Grit test tape, I might patent the idea.
 

essexandy

The Lake Governor
I’ve heard about the smell during my bit of research about it but apparently once it’s dried it’s ok. Dunno tbf as I’ve never used it.

I’ve potentially got a job coming up over skimming a number of rooms in an ex council house after my mates done the rewire but house is empty. Should be a good test bed for it.
Personally I don't dislike the smell. Certainly no worse than me after thirty metres of screeding.
 

Stewie03

Well-Known Member
4411909C-DBA2-4329-8521-BB6F3AB87C79.jpeg
Had one today luckily enough been caught in time blue gritted over artex Thursday day went back Friday and saw some peeling put a scraper behind it and it was just shelling off thought it was wallpaper underneath the artex but was distemper so I’ve been lucky really like I say you truly never know what your going over
 

malc

TPF Special Forces
I’ve used it for years too ,
But no more
Why do you use grit bond? All i ever use is PVA. in UK.
I did use the red and green grits in the Netherlands as that was what they supplied but I find PVA easy to use ,less to cover and I have never had it fail.
 

superspread

Well-Known Member
Cos to
Why do you use grit bond? All i ever use is PVA. in UK.
I did use the red and green grits in the Netherlands as that was what they supplied but I find PVA easy to use ,less to cover and I have never had it fail.
do it properly you need to give it 3 coats !!! And pva is no good on a silky/glossy wall
 

Topcatz

New Member
Grit or should I say Bond-it, bit of brand loyalty here, is designed for glossy surfaces, from silk paints to tiles. So provided that area is clean it should adhere to it but it must be clean and dust free. If it fails on the substrate you can at times see dust etc on the back of it.
Failures with plaster are predominately due to not mixing it up enough so not enough aggregate in it for the plaster to grip to. Of course it can be applied to thinly which again is a lack of a mechanical key, so not a good idea to dilute it with anything.
If you’re going over it with Bonding coat the depth should not exceed 8mm.
Failure to use any product as per the manufacturer instructions and it’s all on you. Yes it might cost you a bit more time and money but you need to cheat on a lot of jobs to cover 1 fail. Even the PVA manufactures can check the strength of the PVA you used, is it worth the risk? That’s for eac of you to make that cal
Great advice on PF. I've just done a refurb upstairs of an old pub and used bond it plasterers pre grit on 2 coats of SBR 4-1ish, had no calls yet!anyhow, sat in me kitchen half cut, curry bubblin watching possibly one of the greatest films ever, hot tub time machine..! Have a good night
 

superspread

Well-Known Member
Great advice on PF. I've just done a refurb upstairs of an old pub and used bond it plasterers pre grit on 2 coats of SBR 4-1ish, had no calls yet!anyhow, sat in me kitchen half cut, curry bubblin watching possibly one of the greatest films ever, hot tub time machine..! Have a good night
:ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
 

jamesthefirst

Private Member
I don’t dilute anything and don’t cut corners but the manufacturer will always find something they can blame the tradesmen for
As Andy says micro is good stuff but states only water down 10%. I was paying £46 inc vat for it last year but its now around £64, as ive had no failures ill keep buying it and Accrofix ( PRB alternative) from p1shop cheltenham.
 

hollybank

Private Member
As Andy says micro is good stuff but states only water down 10%. I was paying £46 inc vat for it last year but its now around £64, as ive had no failures ill keep buying it and Accrofix ( PRB alternative) from p1shop cheltenham.
I’ve another one to do next week!
Pva or wba I don’t know yet.
I would overboard but it has wardrobes built in and cornice.
 

superspread

Well-Known Member
As Andy says micro is good stuff but states only water down 10%. I was paying £46 inc vat for it last year but its now around £64, as ive had no failures ill keep buying it and Accrofix ( PRB alternative) from p1shop cheltenham.
Is accrofix any good? Was gonna order some but @p1ss want 50£ delivery :mad:
 

Joey_c

New Member
:rolleyes:


I asked bostick to come out and test it but they didn’t want to

DONT USE !!!! Had a major fail with this rubbish and bostick technical guys don’t want to know, cu nts!
Just had a big ceiling fail with this s**t !! Grit is completely adhered to the artex but the Skim has come away clean , how the f**k is this sold as a bonding agent ,never had a fail with bluegrit, spoke to a couple of spreads I know both had ceilings and walls fail on green
 

essexandy

The Lake Governor
Conversely;
On our current job the client used this grit on some steels that needed insulted boards sticking to. Job done and the boards start to delaminate, insulation off the back of the boards. Client decides to hack the lot off the next day and the grit is stuck so well to the steel that even after having to bolster the adhesive off the grit is still there. Very impressive.
 

Stewie03

Well-Known Member
Just had a big ceiling fail with this s**t !! Grit is completely adhered to the artex but the Skim has come away clean , how the f**k is this sold as a bonding agent ,never had a fail with bluegrit, spoke to a couple of spreads I know both had ceilings and walls fail on green
Hate that blue grit I use sovereign never had problems but there again is any grit 100% guaranteed regardless of the manufactures bullshit nothing more safter than overboard
 

Donzo

Well-Known Member
Just had a big ceiling fail with this s**t !! Grit is completely adhered to the artex but the Skim has come away clean , how the f**k is this sold as a bonding agent ,never had a fail with bluegrit, spoke to a couple of spreads I know both had ceilings and walls fail on green
I think when it fails on green,it looks as if its dried out too quickly on it.
All my failures with the stuff. have been on matt paint backgrounds.
 

BryanJ

Well-Known Member
You can carry out an easy test for grit suitability using my tape. Stick a strip to the wall and leave for a few mins. If it has not stuck to wall then prep wall. If it has stuck well pull away sharply and check paint is still adhered to wall. Grit test tape, I might patent the idea.
Are you going to give a refund for the full cost, if the background passes the grit test tape but then the work fails?
 
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