Boarding ceilings

To me it looks like it will only screw on the joist and hold the board close to the ceiling timbers, when it is screwed onto plasterboard it has an extra 9-12mm gap so you will have to push the board up to the joists to screw anyway. So whats the point in the tool?
Obviously when you fit the last board you have little option but to screw it to the joists through a previously fitted sheet and therefore the last sheet will be supported slightly further away from the joists and need lifting a bit as you screw it up. However, as the last board is likely to need trimming to fit or pushing into a corner, being able to move it around to mark or trim is an advantage.
 
I have a hoist but the support frame buckled, still usable, but I find the thing hard work to transport anyway so invested in these, they're expensive for what they are, but they're brilliant, easily attached (I use 60mm drywall screws), very strong, can be used on all domestic jobs as opposed to the hoist and something that will fit behind the seats as opposed to taking up half the van is a no brainer.

The hoist and bars are similarly priced, as a owner of both, the bars every time for me despite the price.

ps...Richard from Boardbars asked my opinion, I told him they were too expensive for what they are, he agreed and said he'd wanted to sell them cheaper, but keeping strength and durability was making it difficult.
Thank you very much for the honest review Richard.
I think most things are perhaps seen as a bit expensive initially when they first come to market and hopefully in time we may be able to adjust that but it's a bit of a catch-22 at the moment in that we need sales to enable ordering bigger numbers to get costs down.
Hopefully more people will see beyond the price and look at the benefits as you have.
 
D

Deleted member 32554

Guest
Thank you very much for the honest review Richard.
I think most things are perhaps seen as a bit expensive initially when they first come to market and hopefully in time we may be able to adjust that but it's a bit of a catch-22 at the moment in that we need sales to enable ordering bigger numbers to get costs down.
Hopefully more people will see beyond the price and look at the benefits as you have.
Two points , but first congrats on production
1 what's the minimum width required
2 ,,,, is a secret lol
 
Two points , but first congrats on production
1 what's the minimum width required
2 ,,,, is a secret lol
Hi Bof,
1. The length of the aluminium extrusion (the part that is screwed to the joist) is 880mm. However, they can be used at angles across the joists if needed in tight or awkward spaces.
2. I'm feeling that your secret is that you would like to have a set of Boardbars in your toolkit?
 
D

Deleted member 32554

Guest
Hi Bof,
1. The length of the aluminium extrusion (the part that is screwed to the joist) is 880mm. However, they can be used at angles across the joists if needed in tight or awkward spaces.
2. I'm feeling that your secret is that you would like to have a set of Boardbars in your toolkit?
Excellent , thought you'd cover that situation
Your right about 2 , but I've possibly only spent that much on tools in the last 10 years lol
 
D

Deleted member 32554

Guest
Do you happen to know if the hooks that you screw on were a success , I just use a bit of batten and rotate sometimes or bandstand extension
 

The Apprentice

Well-Known Member
In all honesty I wouldn't buy a set of these, but have used a Boardmate for the last twenty years or so. https://www.google.com/search?q=boa...motorola-gfw&sourceid=chrome-mobile&ie=UTF-8#
Although only when the board lift isn't suitable these days.
These look like a good product for the DIY types though, and do look well made.
They do look well made and I get the price tag, you only get what you pay for and getting the price is vital to building up a good business. The hard part is getting folk to shell out for it with no track record.
If you're working in the domestic market its not often that you get the room to use a board lifter anyway.
 

Spudknit

Well-Known Member
They do look well made and I get the price tag, you only get what you pay for and getting the price is vital to building up a good business. The hard part is getting folk to shell out for it with no track record.
If you're working in the domestic market its not often that you get the room to use a board lifter anyway.
If your working domestic on ur own majority of time 6x3s are best.customer gets charged anyway.if you can't 6x3 by your sen its time to pack it in I'd say.cant see it selling in the masses but ye it's well made
 

Ritch

Well-Known Member
If your working domestic on ur own majority of time 6x3s are best.customer gets charged anyway.if you can't 6x3 by your sen its time to pack it in I'd say.cant see it selling in the masses but ye it's well made
6x3 lol the gun show,. 8x4 a bit heavy for your freckley ginger arms
 
Hes hardly guna start giving you tips on using battens is he he's trying to run a buisness ffs :ROFLMAO:
there are loads of different techniques and methods out there and varying bit's of equipment in a wide variety of price ranges.
We're not dismissing any alternatives but we've just tried to come up with something that overcomes the restrictions of the other options.
 
In all honesty I wouldn't buy a set of these, but have used a Boardmate for the last twenty years or so. https://www.google.com/search?q=boa...motorola-gfw&sourceid=chrome-mobile&ie=UTF-8#
Although only when the board lift isn't suitable these days.
These look like a good product for the DIY types though, and do look well made.
The boardmate product is what my business partner used to use but felt they didn't really cut it and still required a prop meaning the board was wedged in place and not easily moved or trimmed if needed.
The lifter as discussed previously is quite a big piece of kit and needs a clear floor space. Also it doesn't allow a clear space under the supported board for platforms etc on higher ceilings.
 
They do look well made and I get the price tag, you only get what you pay for and getting the price is vital to building up a good business. The hard part is getting folk to shell out for it with no track record.
If you're working in the domestic market its not often that you get the room to use a board lifter anyway.
Thanks, they are well made and will give long service. As much as we'd like a cheaper price we weren't prepared to compromise quality especially when working overhead.
We are prepared for a slow growth as it takes a while to establish a new product but then everything was new once and as the positive reviews grow hopefully the business will too.
 

Spudknit

Well-Known Member
Thanks, they are well made and will give long service. As much as we'd like a cheaper price we weren't prepared to compromise quality especially when working overhead.
We are prepared for a slow growth as it takes a while to establish a new product but then everything was new once and as the positive reviews grow hopefully the business will too.
Good luck with it just don't be a tit like Mr tapit.you look like you can handle constructive criticism
 

essexandy

The Lake Governor
The boardmate product is what my business partner used to use but felt they didn't really cut it and still required a prop meaning the board was wedged in place and not easily moved or trimmed if needed.
The lifter as discussed previously is quite a big piece of kit and needs a clear floor space. Also it doesn't allow a clear space under the supported board for platforms etc on higher ceilings.
I really don't know how the Boardmate doesn't cut it? Definitely no need for a prop whilst using one. They recommend that two are used, but I've honestly never needed to.
The thing about trimming the board whilst up against the ceiling is utter nonsense. If you're anything other than a complete novice you will hardly ever need to, and if you do you just screw the board up apart from the last row of screws and do it.
 
I have a hoist but the support frame buckled, still usable, but I find the thing hard work to transport anyway so invested in these, they're expensive for what they are, but they're brilliant, easily attached (I use 60mm drywall screws), very strong, can be used on all domestic jobs as opposed to the hoist and something that will fit behind the seats as opposed to taking up half the van is a no brainer.

The hoist and bars are similarly priced, as a owner of both, the bars every time for me despite the price.

ps...Richard from Boardbars asked my opinion, I told him they were too expensive for what they are, he agreed and said he'd wanted to sell them cheaper, but keeping strength and durability was making it difficult.
Richard, we have offered a 15% discount on a limited number of sets for forum member's so I'll contact you privately to arrange an equivalent refund
 

TonyM

Private Member
I really don't know how the Boardmate doesn't cut it? Definitely no need for a prop whilst using one. They recommend that two are used, but I've honestly never needed to.
The thing about trimming the board whilst up against the ceiling is utter nonsense. If you're anything other than a complete novice you will hardly ever need to, and if you do you just screw the board up apart from the last row of screws and do it.
Trimming above your head means all the dust goes in your face. Measure, cut and sling it up. None of this slidey bar nonsense
 

Spudknit

Well-Known Member
Unfortunately the one area that your product is the same as the holy tape shite, is that you're offering a solution to a problem that doesn't exist for the professional tradesman. DIY, maybe, but that's about it.
Invention for the sake of it if you like.
Yes but how many diy spreads are spreads now with courses etc.any course qualified spread to moi is diy level
 

essexandy

The Lake Governor
Yes but how many diy spreads are spreads now with courses etc.any course qualified spread to moi is diy level
I can't see even a courser using these bars for more than a ceiling or two before realising there are more efficient, and just as easy or easier ways to do the job.
 
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