Boarding ceilings

smoother09

Well-Known Member
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Spudknit

Well-Known Member
Yes, I'm sorry to say it, but putting that kind of pricetag on it is likely to discourage punters and encourage far-eastern knock-offs :confused:

I would've thought £80-ish would be more appropriate.

After all, you can buy a full lifter/hoist for £170
Ye but why would you buy a full hoist and have to cart the fcker around and store it when you can buy two bars that can be thrown in van.
 

tapit

Well-Known Member
Yes, I'm sorry to say it, but putting that kind of pricetag on it is likely to discourage punters and encourage far-eastern knock-offs :confused:

I would've thought £80-ish would be more appropriate.

After all, you can buy a full lifter/hoist for £170
The tooling and initial costs for that type of product would be very high for small numbers. I would expect the price to come down as it scales up. The fact you can move the board while up in the air and its small size compared to a lifter, ticks the boxes for me.
 
To me it looks like it will only screw on the joist and hold the board close to the ceiling timbers, when it is screwed onto plasterboard it has an extra 9-12mm gap so you will have to push the board up to the joists to screw anyway. So whats the point in the tool?
 
Saw these and thought they might be helpful for someone.
Don’t think the link works so it might be a copy and paste job
Thanks for bringing these up in a discussion, it gives us a bit of exposure and a chance to interact directly with the group of people we designed the product for.
I have only just joined your forum and I'll go through all the post's and try to address all the points.
 
I have a hoist but the support frame buckled, still usable, but I find the thing hard work to transport anyway so invested in these, they're expensive for what they are, but they're brilliant, easily attached (I use 60mm drywall screws), very strong, can be used on all domestic jobs as opposed to the hoist and something that will fit behind the seats as opposed to taking up half the van is a no brainer.

The hoist and bars are similarly priced, as a owner of both, the bars every time for me despite the price.

ps...Richard from Boardbars asked my opinion, I told him they were too expensive for what they are, he agreed and said he'd wanted to sell them cheaper, but keeping strength and durability was making it difficult.
 
Thought the same myself, can see a use for it specially on domestics but £125 like @Cockney1 says is a bit rich imo
Thanks for the interest.
We wrangled over the price a lot and when we started out we had visions of making them much cheaper, however as we worked through the design and testing it quickly became clear that if we wanted to make then strong, durable and long lasting then we needed stronger better materials.
We also wanted to keep them small enough to transport easily but strong enough to be safe and not deflect.
We considered buying parts from the far east but wanted to keep it UK made and have better quality so that was dismissed.
One of the advantages is that most people could use boardbars to put up sheets single handedly and this could considerably cut labour costs.
 
The tooling and initial costs for that type of product would be very high for small numbers. I would expect the price to come down as it scales up. The fact you can move the board while up in the air and its small size compared to a lifter, ticks the boxes for me.
The initial costs haven't been as high as expected as I'm an engineer and was able to sort certain things by calling in a few favours. The biggest shock was the cost of good quality materials which we didn't want to cut corners on.
The ability to move the board into position or to trim at ceiling level was one of our must haves and again should save considerable time.
I'm glad we're ticking your boxes
 
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