Anyone dye there primer

D

Deleted member 32554

Guest
Food colouring is safe to use, but don't pva and let it dry, when painted the emulsion paint was not penetrating because pva had set. Skimming is applied on tacky pva, it says on container, if you do dry then your changing spec.
I have NEVER skimmed dry PVA , not saying it wouldn't stick bit it's not as good bond
A tight skim over dry PVA runs a greater risk of delaminating when mist coating .
I don't patch and feather out , its patched then when dry is blended with toupret filler
 

Baptist2017

Active Member
I have NEVER skimmed dry PVA , not saying it wouldn't stick bit it's not as good bond
A tight skim over dry PVA runs a greater risk of delaminating when mist coating .
I don't patch and feather out , its patched then when dry is blended with toupret filler

Every job you say seems backwards and hard work. But fair play if it works for you pal
 
D

Deleted member 32554

Guest
Dry pva club here never an issue. Only skim tacky if absolutely have to. Pva first its usually dry in 20 mins (decent pva)
Spent first 10 years sand/ cement/ lime , my dad would skim it , ( i always said skimming was poofters work ) , had a bad run with external render ,weather and a couple of builders going tits up and claiming bankruptcy so took the plunge and learnt to skim on my own , PVA was always skimmed wet or tacky , said that on the tub , so after 30 y overskimming it's second nature and causes me no problems to hit it tacky .

If PVA is OK to skim dry why did they bring out the grit
 

lurpak

Artex Boy
Spent first 10 years sand/ cement/ lime , my dad would skim it , ( i always said skimming was poofters work ) , had a bad run with external render ,weather and a couple of builders going tits up and claiming bankruptcy so took the plunge and learnt to skim on my own , PVA was always skimmed wet or tacky , said that on the tub , so after 30 y overskimming it's second nature and causes me no problems to hit it tacky .

If PVA is OK to skim dry why did they bring out the grit

Grit is to create a new surface on problematic surfaces. Ie: some paints, if you pva them, the paint just sits there which is why you see or hear about peoples walls coming down in "sheets" because the spread didn't understand his background.

Grit creates a new surface to skim onto. Pva soaks in.
 

Retired Spread

Well-Known Member
You make it too easy for them mate bitch be on soon too


pmsl another mug dimwit sucked in by Lurpaks bullshit......u his lab?


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D

Deleted member 32554

Guest
So usually on non porous surfaces I scratch with Stanley , wet coat , see if it peels, if it does I remove it ,
This also partly explains my double visit skimming on dodgy surfaces ( PVA, lay on skim , flatten , touching as little as poss , leave to dry then proceed as normal overskim)
 

Gurva

Well-Known Member
Pva’d walls on a Monday back in the day got punted to other jobs through the week,skimmed them on a Friday still on 10 year later.wouldnt run the risk leaving it to long nowadays but being books in years ago you never knew where you were working day to day,Can’t be bothered waiting on a panel or two being tacky to skim I’d rather just prep all day then hit it the following days,either prepping or skimming hardly ever do the two the same day tbh.each to there own I suppose
 
D

Deleted member 32554

Guest
I was always taught skim when tacky, then I read more and more posts on here about dry pva re-emulsifying and joined the club. Haven't used grit since. On a very glossy surface you can peel grit off sometimes too. Oh yes you can.
In the words of an much respected ex member
" it aw bollocs , c,nt "
 

Donzo

Well-Known Member
I tried it today not gonna comment yet until I see it painted ok
If looks ok I’ll thank @Donzo
If it bleeds threw I’ll blame donzo
Putting white pva on white silk painted surfaces, it is reasy to miss bits, it is a aid and a bit of piece of mind all the surface has been covered with adhesive. Simple, and this tip was on this forum years ago, not by me. Not expensive either, applied correctly and wipe any splashes off any uncovered surfaces then easy. Grit has pigments as said that don't bleed through. Do not apply too thick and allow to dry then you could have bleed through, I have never had it.
 

taylorhendersonplastering

Well-Known Member
Spent first 10 years sand/ cement/ lime , my dad would skim it , ( i always said skimming was poofters work ) , had a bad run with external render ,weather and a couple of builders going tits up and claiming bankruptcy so took the plunge and learnt to skim on my own , PVA was always skimmed wet or tacky , said that on the tub , so after 30 y overskimming it's second nature and causes me no problems to hit it tacky .

If PVA is OK to skim dry why did they bring out the grit
I’m the same mate have always skimmed over tacky pva I was always thought to go wet on wet so pulls in together..everyone does it different..
 
No, certain brands of pva do not emulsify now. pva has come on quite a bit now, with new additives now if you research it if interested.

that is a new one on me..... will have to check that on my next job :D I sense a lot of roller sleeves will be thrown away in the future
 

FreeD

Private Member
Simple...I use blue grit all the time and if for example plastering over Artex...I just wank a bit of blue grit in the PVA...only need a bit to see where you have been X
 

Butty

Member
I have on occasion put Coffee in my pva. Makes it easy to see. Causes no issues. I’m in the dry brigade. But normally like 2 or 3 coats to skim on dry.
 

Vincey

Private Member
Sorted a yellow in the end but gone full circle and won’t dye again due to it being a bummer if catch end of roller on any new plaster that don’t want primer or woodwork etc
Maybe on a cleared out s**t whole refurb I’d use again
Still not seen painted yet but will see
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