A GUIDE TO FLOATING WALLS

theclemo

Private Member
I find I have to rule off hardwall again after it pulls in a bit.

Yes I do that to. I just find that hardwall don't rule as flat as sand and cement. And floating the hardwall I find the float just glides over it.
 

malc

TPF Special Forces
Yes I do that to. I just find that hardwall don't rule as flat as sand and cement. And floating the hardwall I find the float just glides over it.

if high suction we 2 coat hardwall, first coat kills suction, lay on 2nd coat and rule in, we use a featheredge rule, a lot of plasterers use a darby.
if low suction, may put the room on before i start to rule, then check to make sure it has not slumped.
we leave the hardwall pull in, then with a light spray of water devil up with a diamond float.
 

Cornelius

Well-Known Member
if high suction we 2 coat hardwall, first coat kills suction, lay on 2nd coat and rule in, we use a featheredge rule, a lot of plasterers use a darby.
if low suction, may put the room on before i start to rule, then check to make sure it has not slumped.
we leave the hardwall pull in, then with a light spray of water devil up with a diamond float.
What size darby? Surely not a standard 1.2, I've got a 1.8, 2.0 and a 2.4 for floating and normal 1.2 for external rendering.
 
A very well described guide on dot / screed. For what it's worth I still use this method to this day when the walls have to be within the millimetre.

For accurate work this method when done right can not be beaten. I don't often use it these days due to time constraints but for high class work I believe this method can not be beaten.

And fair play to the poster for an accurate description, proper text book.
 

Stewie03

Well-Known Member
I still use the same old fashioned method when I was an apprentice the box screed method i put my vertical and horizontal screeds on first level them off then fill in the middle and level that off job done wait for it to pull in a bit and give it a float up ready for skimming
 

Danil

New Member
when you float a wall the important lines are the internal angles, the skirting line and the ceiling line. the least important is the middle where you are placing your screed. you may as well rule the wall in freehand.
I agree with you
 

Retired Spread

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the guide kirk. It is for us newbies and will help.
thrust.gif
 

The Hobo

Well-Known Member
a wall is a wall and should be wright end of I worked on heysham power station the tolerance was 3mm
 
Top