1st job nerves.

triple A

New Member
hi gang, worked with a 35 yr experienced plasterer for 1.5yrs and regularly practise on wall in spare room. can get a smooth wall now. been told I'm at a standard were I can earn money. any tips on how you got over your nerves before your 1st paid job I'm excited but bloody nervous. cheers.
 

bof

Well-Known Member
hi gang, worked with a 35 yr experienced plasterer for 1.5yrs and regularly practise on wall in spare room. can get a smooth wall now. been told I'm at a standard were I can earn money. any tips on how you got over your nerves before your 1st paid job I'm excited but bloody nervous. cheers.
Relax and enjoy
 

Monkey Boy

Well-Known Member
Just say to yourself:
“I’ve got the skills, determination and quick thinking initiative and as a last resort phone a friends option - I’ll be fine”
 

MakeItSmooth

Well-Known Member
hi gang, worked with a 35 yr experienced plasterer for 1.5yrs and regularly practise on wall in spare room. can get a smooth wall now. been told I'm at a standard were I can earn money. any tips on how you got over your nerves before your 1st paid job I'm excited but bloody nervous. cheers.

1) Always keep a bucket and a spare bin liner in the back of the van, for emergencies when you can't use the customer's khazi. And a couple of bog rolls.

2) Don't make the mistake of relying on a flexi trowel too early in the set. That approach will bite you, sooner or later.

3a) Even if there's good daylight on site, always take powerful LED lights with you, to shine sideways-on for your work, to check you haven't got ripples, before it's too late and it's set. Could save you some embarrassment. If funds are tight, you can get by with a couple of 100w LED panel lights (about £12 each on eBay). Screwfix also do some OK Erbauer lights on a tripod/monopole, for about £50.

3b) Before you start quoting for paying jobs, shine powerful LED lights on your practice wall in your spare room, to check that you've reached a standard of achieving a wall without significant ripples.

4) Your end result is only as good as your prep - learn how to prepare different surfaces - don't just slap on a coat of PVA and assume it's ready for skimming. Some walls are much more absorbent than others.
If a wall has been stripped of wallpaper, don't be lazy - check the wallpaper paste residue has been dealt with before you start skimming, or you'll regret it.

5) Don't look in the customer's knicker drawer - the odds are you'll get caught! ;)

6, 7 & 8) You probably don't need newfangled tape with holes in it....
 

John j

Mono Don
1) Always keep a bucket and a spare bin liner in the back of the van, for emergencies when you can't use the customer's khazi. And a couple of bog rolls.

2) Don't make the mistake of relying on a flexi trowel too early in the set. That approach will bite you, sooner or later.

3a) Even if there's good daylight on site, always take powerful LED lights with you, to shine sideways-on for your work, to check you haven't got ripples, before it's too late and it's set. Could save you some embarrassment. If funds are tight, you can get by with a couple of 100w LED panel lights (about £12 each on eBay). Screwfix also do some OK Erbauer lights on a tripod/monopole, for about £50.

3b) Before you start quoting for paying jobs, shine powerful LED lights on your practice wall in your spare room, to check that you've reached a standard of achieving a wall without significant ripples.

4) Your end result is only as good as your prep - learn how to prepare different surfaces - don't just slap on a coat of PVA and assume it's ready for skimming. Some walls are much more absorbent than others.
If a wall has been stripped of wallpaper, don't be lazy - check the wallpaper paste residue has been dealt with before you start skimming, or you'll regret it.

5) Don't look in the customer's knicker drawer - the odds are you'll get caught! ;)

6, 7 & 8) You probably don't need newfangled tape with holes in it....
Anyone gonna give short version
 

Retired Spread

Well-Known Member
keep it simple, don't over-complicate it like some of the lumps do on here.

fk the gimmicky flexi trowels off and get used to using 1 quality worn in stiff trowel through the whole set.
 

Complete

Well-Known Member
You must be absolutely brilliant at plastering.
The guy who taught me never once praised my work, best I ever got was 'it'll do' worst was the lath axe thrown at me, full force, chest height, then the lump hammer. The resulting hole in the wall was my fault too!
 

tapit

Well-Known Member
1) Always keep a bucket and a spare bin liner in the back of the van, for emergencies when you can't use the customer's khazi. And a couple of bog rolls.

2) Don't make the mistake of relying on a flexi trowel too early in the set. That approach will bite you, sooner or later.

3a) Even if there's good daylight on site, always take powerful LED lights with you, to shine sideways-on for your work, to check you haven't got ripples, before it's too late and it's set. Could save you some embarrassment. If funds are tight, you can get by with a couple of 100w LED panel lights (about £12 each on eBay). Screwfix also do some OK Erbauer lights on a tripod/monopole, for about £50.

3b) Before you start quoting for paying jobs, shine powerful LED lights on your practice wall in your spare room, to check that you've reached a standard of achieving a wall without significant ripples.

4) Your end result is only as good as your prep - learn how to prepare different surfaces - don't just slap on a coat of PVA and assume it's ready for skimming. Some walls are much more absorbent than others.
If a wall has been stripped of wallpaper, don't be lazy - check the wallpaper paste residue has been dealt with before you start skimming, or you'll regret it.

5) Don't look in the customer's knicker drawer - the odds are you'll get caught! ;)

6, 7 & 8) You probably don't need newfangled tape with holes in it....
6,7 and 8 but if you do ......
 

ChrispyUK

Well-Known Member
I used to get nervous, but not so often now as I’ve learned to get over most problems. Plaster smells fear, so don’t get monkey brained if you’re getting stressed and it’s going off quicker than you’d like. Stay focused. Worst case scenario, you’ll have to slap another coat on and miss coronation st.

sponge float can save the day.

I’m not a plasterer btw, just a chancer
 

The Hobo

Well-Known Member
hi gang, worked with a 35 yr experienced plasterer for 1.5yrs and regularly practise on wall in spare room. can get a smooth wall now. been told I'm at a standard were I can earn money. any tips on how you got over your nerves before your 1st paid job I'm excited but bloody nervous. cheers.
bottle of rum m8
 

smoother09

Well-Known Member
I used to get nervous, but not so often now as I’ve learned to get over most problems. Plaster smells fear, so don’t get monkey brained if you’re getting stressed and it’s going off quicker than you’d like. Stay focused. Worst case scenario, you’ll have to slap another coat on and miss coronation st.

sponge float can save the day.

I’m not a plasterer btw, just a chancer
Stop advising people to use a sponge float I can't believe it even gets a mention on the forum ffs!
 

The Hobo

Well-Known Member
I used to get nervous, but not so often now as I’ve learned to get over most problems. Plaster smells fear, so don’t get monkey brained if you’re getting stressed and it’s going off quicker than you’d like. Stay focused. Worst case scenario, you’ll have to slap another coat on and miss coronation st.

sponge float can save the day.

I’m not a plasterer btw, just a chancer
i think it was @pualf mentioned that to me
 
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